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Archaeologists are investigating the remains of Pompeii, a city frozen in time (31 Pics)

Archaeologists have excavated the house of a 'wealthy and cultured' man who lived in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii that was buried by ash and rock spewed by the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.
Mount Vesuvius, on the west coast of Italy, is the only active volcano in continental Europe and is thought to be one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. 
The eruption belched out a lethal combination of toxic sulphurous gas and hundreds of tonnes of volcanic ash that buried the cities of Pompeii, Oplontis, and Stabiae overnight. 
Seismic activity from Vesuvius also triggered a deadly mudflow, wiping out the ancient city of Herculaneum
Conservation work is now underway and new finds have been uncovered at a private house known as the 'House of Jupiter' (Casa di Giove) in the Regio V part of the ancient city.
The house was already partly excavated between the 18th and 19th centuries but archaeologists have uncovered yet more frescoes and ornate remains that give us an insight into everyday life thousands of years ago.
The 2,000 year-old works of art are in good condition, despite surviving one of the most devastating volcanic eruptions in written history.








The Orto dei fuggiaschi (The garden of the Fugitives) shows the 13 bodies of victims who were buried by the ashes as they attempted to flee Pompeii during the 79 AD eruption of the Vesuvius volcano
A plaster cast of a dog, from the House of Orpheus, Pompeii, AD 79. Around 30,000 people are believed to have died in the chaos, with bodies still being discovered to this day
Hundreds of refugees sheltering in the vaulted arcades at the seaside in Herculaneum, clutching their jewellery and money, were killed instantly. Pictured is volcanic debris found at the new site






An amphora recovered during excavation works at the 'Vicolo dei Balconi' (Alley of Balconies) was recently uncovered
Massimo Osanna, Superintendent of the Special Superintendency for the archaeological heritage of Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabia shows a bronze vase discovered during excavation works at the archaeological site of Pompeii, where the 'Vicolo dei Balconi' (Alley of Balconies) was recently uncovered in Pompeii, Italy, The Alley of Balconies was uncovered in previously unexcavated area in Pompeii. Uncovered buildings with big balconies have Pompeian red colors and geometric, flowers and animal decorations. Almost two thousand years after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, the buildings will be restored and will become a part of a route at the Pompeii.
A man points at a detail of a fresco that was found during excavation works in the archaeological site of Pompeii.
 Archaeologists excavating an unexplored part of Pompeii have discovered a street of houses with intact balconies that were buried when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD. Right, jaguar painted on tiles recovered during excavation works at the archaeological site of Pompeii, where the 'Vicolo dei Balconi' (Alley of Balconies) was recently uncovered
A column with overlaid marble emerged from the ground during excavation works at the archaeological site of Pompeii, where the 'Vicolo dei Balconi' (Alley of Balconies) was recently uncovered in Pompeii, Italy. The Alley of Balconies was uncovered in previously unexcavated area in Pompeii.
Details of frescos that were found during excavation works in the archaeological site of Pompeii



Part of a fresco at domus delle Nozze d'Argento in Pompeii, Italy
One of the rooms of the Domus Nozze d'Argento (room of the Silver Wedding) in Pompeii, Italy
One of the rooms of the Domus Nozze d'Argento (room of the Silver Wedding) in Pompeii, Italy
A skeleton of a child found during new excavations in the ruins of Pompeii, Naples, Italy
The domus delle Nozze d'Argento shows part of a fresco in Pompeii, Italy

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