Header Ads

Twitter Rejects Ad With Phrase ‘Illegal Alien,' Calls Term 'Hateful Content,' Group Claims


When foreigners enter America without permission, they're called "illegal aliens." They aren't "undocumented immigrants," that's a silly term foisted on us from the PC mainstream media. They're "alien" ("belonging to a foreign country or nation") who are here illegally ("in a way that is contrary to or forbidden by law"). Simple.
But Twitter doesn't like that term, according to the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS).
"Yesterday, Twitter rejected four Center for Immigration Studies tweets for use in the Center's Twitter Ads campaign, alleging hateful content," CIS wrote in a statement on its website on Wednesday. "All four tweets use the statutory phrases 'illegal alien' or 'criminal alien,' and all of the tweets referenced law enforcement, either at the border or in the interior."
Twitter's only response to an inquiry about why promotion of the tweets was rejected: "We've reviewed your tweets and confirmed that it is ineligible to participate in the Twitter Ads program at this time based on our Hateful Content policy. Violating content includes, but is not limited to, that which is hate speech or advocacy against a protected group."
Fox News reported that "the tweet in question featured a video from a political news site. The video of 'illegal aliens pouring across the border,' CIS argued, 'reminds us why we need a wall,' " Fox wrote.
But CIS said the term "illegal alien" is correct and "has been used in both federal law and by the Supreme Court."

The term “illegal alien” is a precise term in law, Hans von Spakovsky, a senior legal fellow at The Heritage Foundation, wrote in a recent commentary for The Daily Signal.
‘Alien’—rather than ‘immigrant’—is the correct legal term, since ‘alien’ is defined in 8 U.S.C. §1101 (a)(3) as ‘any person not a citizen or national of the United States.’
Precision in the law is a vital principle, since the exact words used in statutes, regulations, contracts, guidance documents, and policy statements can significantly affect how they are applied and interpreted.
At a congressional hearing on Twitter's transparency and accountability last week, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey admitted that the platform's algorithm has been "unfair."
In reference to the so-called "shadow-banning" of some 600,000 accounts, which included some members of Congress, Dorsey acknowledged that the platform's "quality filter" had suppressed the visibility of accounts using parameters that unfairly impacted some users.
Over the weekend, Twitter suspended former Army Ranger and Benghazi hero Kris Paronto for mocking former President Barack Obama and liberals after another Twitter account claimed that Obama killed Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.
The incident happened after a far-left Twitter account told Robert J. O'Neill — the Navy SEAL who is credited with killing bin Laden — that it was Obama who killed the Islamic terrorist.

No comments