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Not An SNL Sketch: New ‘Consent Condom’ Requires Two People To Open It

It could just as easily be an SNL sketch every bit as much as a legitimate product, but it does seem that the new "consent condom" is real, according to the New York Post.
"Tulipán, an Argentinian sex toy company, has created a new rubber that requires four hands to open — ensuring that both parties are equally involved in the decision to have sex," reports the outlet. "How it works: All four corners of the packaging must be pressed at the same time to open it."
The tagline for the Tulipán condom reads: "If it’s not a yes, it’s a no."
The "consent condom" will not be available on the market until later this year. In the meantime, Tulipán will be handing out the condoms to couples at bars in Buenos Aires. Insider reports that feedback has generally been fairly positive. Current ads on social media show how couples can open the tricky contraption:
Joaquin Campins of BBDO, the agency promoting the condoms, said that the "consent condom" reinforces the idea that sex is only pleasurable if both partners give consent. "Tulipán has always spoken of safe pleasure, but for this campaign, we understood that we had to talk about the most important thing in every sexual relationship — pleasure is possible only if you both give your consent,” he said.
 
According to Fox News, the brand has been using that same "consent equals pleasure" sentiment in social media campaigns.
"Only if there is consent, there is pleasure. If it is a YES, it's NO," says the ad. "Why this box can only be opened by two? Because this is how consent works in relationships. Everything has to be two."
 
The "consent condom" joins a growing list of products created specifically to curtail sexual assault. In 2016, Psychology Today listed the 10 best assault prevention technologies available on the market, many of which come disguised as jewelry products or other everyday accessories.
The National Sexual Violence Resource Center has estimated that one in five women will be raped at some time in their lives. This is terrifying statistic that should have women anxious and keen to protect themselves. At the same time it illustrates a greater societal problem that needs to be addressed on a more comprehensive scale, and can serve as an incentive for every woman to address the issue of her own personal safety to prevent rape.
While tech devices and apps aren’t the answer. They can help keep girls and women safe in many situations.
To speed these innovations to market some entrepreneurs and startups are getting help from crowdfunding and other means to develop creative products and apps that give women an edge when it comes to personal safety. These range from devices disguised as jewelry to nail polish. Resourceful, effective, and discreet, these innovations can make a critical difference to prevent sexual assault when seconds matter in dangerous or life-threatening situations.
For the "consent condom" to actually become a safety measure against non-consensual sex, it would probably have to become the only type of condom available on the market. And that seems like a reach.

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