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These Real Journalists’ case that our health care system is ‘totally broken and immoral’ could use some work

Without our brave Guardians of Truth, how would we know how much our health care system sucks? Earlier today, Vox’s Sarah Kliff shared “one of the most heartbreaking” stories of our country’s horrible health care policy:
One of the most heartbreaking things I’ve read in our ER bill database:

A 2-year-old eats a dangerous drug. Poison control tells her mom to take the toddler to the ER immediately.

But the family is already in debt from another ER bill. They can’t afford another one. (1/2)

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Here’s what the mom does:

She drives to the ER. But she doesn't go inside.

Instead, she and her toddler sit in the parking lot for hours. They watch the Little Mermaid on loop.

The mom thinks: I can go inside if she has a seizure. Otherwise, I can’t afford it. (2/2)

(2/2).

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As Ezra Klein points out, this sort of thing just “wouldn’t happen in a decent country”:
Incidentally, Klein and Kliff’s tweets are also a reflection of the moral failure of so many so-called journalists. Because had they done their jobs and reported honestly, they wouldn’t have tried to use this story to push their leftist health care policy agenda.
If you read the rest if the story below... she ever actually took her daughter into the emergency room - she just sat with her in the parking lot; if she had, they'd have treated her. Also, it turned out the little girl was fine.

And this makes America not a "decent country"?

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Kliff herself indeed says everything turned out fine:

Luckily, the toddler was fine. They never went into the emergency room, and eventually went home.

I think about this particular family a lot. Their story shows how high prices don’t just mean big medical bills. They also make Americans wary of using our health system. (3/2)

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That’s not really what their story shows, but whatever.
Yes, medical expenses are scary, debt is scary, our healthcare system has problems. But using this story as a reason to say "This story wouldn't happen in a decent country. This is a reflection of our moral failure..."?
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Not to be outdone, after reading about this family’s massive medical bill:
BuzzFeed’s Rosie Gray was pretty sure that our health care system is “totally broken and immoral”:
What Gray failed to mention is that the family ultimately did not have to pay the huge bill:
The family’s health insurance, IU Health Plans, negotiated down the bills and paid $107,863.33, with secondary insurance from the summer camp covering $7,286.34 in additional costs.
The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR.
Now, one can argue that health care costs are out of control — a problem that has only been made worse by increased government interference — but clearly we haven’t quite reached “totally broken and immoral” levels quite yet.
"The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR."

Did you even bother to read the article? Survey says "no".
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Don’t know about you guys, but I read articles before firing off sarcastic quips that turn out to be demonstrably incorrect upon reading the article...

Or she is saying that insurance covering the cost of the accident is broken and immoral?
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Huh. Seemed like it was written in English when I read it. Not sure why it gave you so much trouble.
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It literally states that they did not have to pay anything. Everyone at buzzfeed should stick to quizzes about what kind of garlic toast I am and not actual reporting.
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Well, at least she tried to correct the record:
Well, at least she made her point. Not the point she thought she was making, but a point nonetheless:
Whoops.

So let it be written, so let it be done.

A young girl bitten by a snake at summer camp was left with an elephant-size medical bill of $142,938, her parents say.
Oakley Yoder was 9 last July when a snake bit a toe on her right foot while she was at camp in Shawnee National Forest in Jackson Falls, Ill., according to NPR.
“I was really scared. I thought that I could either get paralyzed or could actually die,” Oakley, now 10, told NPR.
Camp counselors, suspecting the bite was from a venomous copperhead, gave her a piggyback until they reached first responders, who recommended taking her to a hospital by air ambulance, according to the report.
Her frantic parents, Josh Perry and Shelli Yoder, were already waiting at Indiana’s St. Vincent Evansville hospital when she arrived after the 80-mile flight.
“It was a major comfort for me to realize, OK, we’re getting the best care possible,” her dad, a health care ethics professor at Indiana University, Bloomington, told the outlet.
Their relief at their daughter leaving the hospital after less than 24 hours soon turned to horror when the bills started arriving — totaling $142,938, according to the documents shared with NPR.
It included $55,577.64 for the air ambulance — and an even more staggering $67,957 for four vials of antivenin needed to protect her from the bite.
The bill shows the hospital charged $16,989.25 for each unit of CroFab, the only drug available to treat venomous bites from pit vipers at the time — more than five times higher than the average list price of $3,198.
“It’s a profitable drug and everyone wants a piece of it,” said Dr. Leslie Boyer, founding director of research center the VIPER Institute.
The family’s health insurance, IU Health Plans, negotiated down the bills and paid $107,863.33, with secondary insurance from the summer camp covering $7,286.34 in additional costs.
The family ultimately did not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for her additional emergency care, according to NPR.
“I know that in this country, in this system, that is a miracle,” admitted relieved dad Perry, who teaches a course on the ethics of the health care industry.
Oakley’s foot is now healed — and she intends to return to the camp this summer, she told NPR.

1 comment:

  1. Unless YOU take an academic interest in YOUR health and invest some TIME LEARNING to take care of YOURSELF, YOU and YOUR family are going to have poor health outcomes; probably.

    http://healthyprotocols.com/2_cvd_master_intro.htm

    ReplyDelete