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Author poses major abortion challenge to Christians

As the nation's abortion battle heats up, faith leaders like Daniel Darling, a pastor and the vice president for communications of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, are on the front lines.

Darling, whose latest book "The Dignity Revolution: Reclaiming God's Rich Vision for Humanity" works to help people see God's vision for their lives, recently told "The Pure Flix Podcast" why he believes the unborn deserve protection.

"Every generation faces questions of 'Will we stand up for the vulnerable?'" he said. "One of the most pressing ones is abortion, where the least defensible among us — the ones who actually have no voice ... legally can be targeted for death."


Listen to Darling's challenge to Christians at the 4:00-mark:
Darling challenged Christians to stand up and have a voice when it comes to defending the unborn, urging believers to boldly speak out.

"Christians are the ones saying, 'No, even if the law says that's not a human being, we know what God says. That is a human being there,'" he said. "We have to be the ones that stand up and say, at great cost, 'There's a human being there.'"


Darling also spoke about the importance of people recognizing that they are made in God's image — a Christian belief based on Genesis.

He explained that holding to this worldview has a powerful sway over our lives, and added that being "made in God's image" means that there is essentially something special about human beings that is distinct from the rest of creation.

"It impacts the way we see ourselves and the way we see others," he said, noting that it keeps us from thinking we are "here randomly." "I'm created with a purpose by a God who created me in His image."

Embracing this worldview requires a level of humility, as people must recognize that they are made in God's image and not their own. Darling is hoping to address these issues among others in "The Dignity Revolution."

Darling's new book focuses on helping reshape peoples' politics, while also encouraging readers to think more deeply about themselves and the world around then.

The question at its center: "What does it mean to be human?"

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