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Donald Trump vents fury at 'radical left' mayor of Minneapolis as the city-owned venue for his planned anti-Ilhan Omar rally orders president's campaign to pay $530,000 'security costs' or be canceled

Donald Trump picked a fight with Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Tuesday over security charges for the president's upcoming rally that Trump's campaign says are exorbitant and an attempt to cancel the event.
The president's campaign accused Frey, a Democrat, of 'abusing the power of his office and attempting to extort' the campaign by 'conjuring a phony and outlandish bill for security in an effort to block a scheduled Keep America Great rally.'
Trump amplified the claim, calling Frey a 'radical' and saying 'he can't price out free speech. Probably illegal!'
The dispute comes from a demand from AEG, which manages the city-owned Target Center where the rally is scheduled, for the Trump campaign to pay an extra $530,000 in security and other costs or - according to the campaign - have the event canceled. 

AEG has not commented on the dispute but the campaign claims AEG was passing on the charge which the city had come up with. 
Trump is framing the rally as an attack on Ilhan Omar, the radical left-wing Democratic congresswoman who is a member of 'the squad' and a frequent target for him. His campaign thinks they can flip Minnesota to Trump in 2020.
'The lightweight mayor is hurting the great police and other wonderful supporters. 72,000 ticket requests already. Dump Frey and Omar! Make America Great Again!' the president said in a tweet. 

The president's campaign has accused Frey of 'abusing the power of his office and attempting to extort' the campaign by 'conjuring a phony and outlandish bill for security in an effort to block a scheduled Keep America Great rally'
The president's campaign has accused Frey of 'abusing the power of his office and attempting to extort' the campaign by 'conjuring a phony and outlandish bill for security in an effort to block a scheduled Keep America Great rally'
Frey, the mayor, has made no secret of his opposition to Trump coming to the city and appeared to confirm in a tweet that the city authorities were behind the $530,000 demand.
He trolled Trump in a reply that made reference to the campaign's history of sticking cities with security costs.
'Yawn... Welcome to Minneapolis where we pay our bills, we govern with integrity, and we love all of our neighbors,' Frey tweeted. 
He and his police chief, Medaria Arradonon, last week barred off-duty members of the city's police force from attending the rally - or other political events - in uniform.
That prompted an angry backlash from the police union, led by Lt. Bob Kroll, which is now selling 'Cops for Trump' t-shirts which Trump name checked.
Trump said: 'The Police are fighting the Radical Left Mayor, and his ridiculous Uniform Ban. Actually, I LOVE the Cops for Trump shirts. Want to bring some home. I am with you 100%!!!!'
A stand-off with a city over the cost of a rally is hardly a new development for the campaign, but Minnesota appears to be the first to demand money up front.     
Trump's campaign refused to repay the city of El Paso for $470,417.05 in expenses incurred by the local fire department, police department, airport and other government agencies during the president's February visit to the border town.
A late payment fee increased the total costs to more than $500,000.  
In January of 2017, the Center for Public Integrity reported that Trump and his Democratic competitors were all guilty of leaning on cities for security.
Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders were truant in repaying municipalities that provided security for their allies, but Trump has been accused of stiffing them altogether.
The candidate who likes to brag about his crowd sizes had bigger bills. And he refuses to admit on federal forms that he owes those cities any money. 
His campaign never entered into formal contracts with the cities, only the venues, making it impossible for municipalities to collect on those debts. 
However, unusually, the City of Minneapolis owns the Target Center and manages it through AEG, the entertainment giant. Target paid for naming rights and has no role in its management.  
Police officers stand in front of President Donald Trump demonstrators, keeping them separated from Trump supporters during a June rally in Orlando Florida
Police officers stand in front of President Donald Trump demonstrators, keeping them separated from Trump supporters during a June rally in Orlando Florida
The Trump campaign erroneously claimed Tuesday that the U.S. Secret Service 'is solely responsible for coordinating security' and warned that 'withholding the use of the arena would be viewed as a breach of contract and result in court action.' 
In fact security involves the Secret Service and local law enforcement. 
'Additionally, the ridiculous sum of $530,000 is more than 26 times the estimated security costs for a 2009 Target Center health care rally held by President Barack Obama. Police officials estimated that the costs then were around $20,000. Again, the costs are a matter between the city and the Secret Service,' the statement said. 
Frey did not dispute the underlying facts of the matter on Tuesday morning. 
A news article the Trump campaign provided as evidence of its claims said that 50 extra officers were brought in to secure Obama's rally at the center ten years ago, and the added security measures were expected to cost more than $20,000. A final tally of costs was not provided.
Frey had not responded to the Obama cost comparison as of Tuesday morning. Requests for comment from the mayor's office were not immediately returned, either. 
The Obama rally was held 10 years prior, though, and the Twin Cities Pioneer Press article only referred to police department costs. It did not address charges to other local agencies the city may have incurred such as medical, fire and aviation costs.
In a tweet several hours hours prior to the charge, Frey said Trump would not be successful in his attempt to flip the state of Minnesota, which the Republican lost to Clinton by a fewer than a half-million vote.
Retweeting the state Democratic Party, which had called Trump's message 'hateful,' Frey said: 'We've seen this playbook before. Trying to drive a wedge between Minneapolis and Greater Minnesota didn't work in 2018 and — with your help — it won't work in 2020.'
Trump labeled him a radical leftist in Tuesday morning tweet. The president claimed his attempt to collect was 'probably illegal,' and he'd still be rallying his supporters on Thursday night.
'Someone please tell the Radical Left Mayor of Minneapolis that he can’t price out Free Speech. Probably illegal! I stand strongly & proudly with the great Police Officers and Law Enforcement of Minneapolis and the Great State of Minnesota! See you Thursday Night!' he asserted.


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