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Ending lockdown will be 'supremely difficult': PM warns of tough choices as he unveils 50-page 'exit plan' for more outdoor exercise, wearing masks in shops, and sport behind closed doors - with social 'bubbles' to see friends and family from NEXT MONTH (30 Pics)

Boris Johnson admitted ending lockdown will be 'supremely difficult' today as he unveiled an 'exit plan' that could see family and friends reuniting next month.
The PM played down expectations of a quick end to the misery for the country, saying going 'too far and too fast' risked a devastating second peak.
Addressing the Commons, he said the government would be driven 'not by hope or economic recovery as an end in itself but by data and science and public health'.  
The note of caution came as the government finally published its 50-page 'road map' finally this afternoon - after a shambolic 12 hours since Boris Johnson's address to the nation.
The blueprint stressed that the five tests have not yet been met, and so major loosening of the draconian curbs is not possible.  
But the document said 'smarter' social distancing measures are being introduced to try and nudge the country back to some sort of normality. In the future restrictions will be targeted 'more precisely', recognising that 'not everybody's or every group's risk is the same'. 
The guidelines say those who can should continue to work from home 'for the foreseeable future', and pointed to full health and safety guidelines due to be published tomorrow. 
From Wednesday all workers are being urged to return to duties in sectors such as food production, construction, manufacturing, logistics, distribution and scientific research in laboratories. 
'The only exceptions to this are those workplaces such as hospitality and non-essential retail which during this first step the Government is requiring to remain closed,' the document said. 
The plan said schools cannot yet fully reopen, but said more key workers should be encouraged to send their children. 'There is a large societal benefit from vulnerable children, or the children of critical workers, attending school: local authorities and schools should therefore urge more children who would benefit from attending in person to do so,' it said. 
Face coverings are being advised for people on public transport and in enclosed spaces - something that happened in Scotland a fortnight ago. 
The document also corrected another blunder overnight, stating clearly that people are able to play outdoor sports such as tennis or golf with one other person from another household.  
Addressing the Commons, Boris Johnson said the government would be driven 'not by helping our economic recovery as an end in itself but by data and science and public health'
Addressing the Commons, Boris Johnson said the government would be driven 'not by helping our economic recovery as an end in itself but by data and science and public health'
Commuters at North Acton station on the Central Line this morning following the easing of coronavirus lockdown rules
Commuters at North Acton station on the Central Line this morning following the easing of coronavirus lockdown rules 

From next month, primary schools will start to get back up and running for reception, year 1 and year 6. But classes will be kept small, and the majority of secondaries are set to stay closed until September.
'The Government’s ambition is for all primary school children to return to school before the summer for a month if feasible,' the plan said. 
Parents will not face fines for refusing to send their children. 
At this point the government will also look at 'permitting cultural and sporting events to take place behind closed-doors for broadcast, while avoiding the risk of large-scale social contact'. 
More non-essential shops will also start to be opened - although hairdressers and beauty salons are not likely to return until July at the earliest.  
The document also sets out how families and friends might be able to mix from next month, if the virus remains under control.  
'As restrictions continue, the Government is considering a range of options to reduce the most harmful social effects to make the measures more sustainable.
'For example, the Government has asked SAGE to examine whether, when and how it can safely change the regulations to allow people to expand their household group to include one other household in the same exclusive group.
'The intention of this change would be to allow those who are isolated some more social contact, and to reduce the most harmful effects of the current social restrictions, while continuing to limit the risk of chains of transmission. It would also support some families to return to work by, for example, allowing two households to share childcare.
'This could be based on the New Zealand model of household 'bubbles' where a single 'bubble' is the people you live with.
'As in New Zealand, the rationale behind keeping household groups small is to limit the number of social contacts people have and, in particular, to limit the risk of inter-household transmissions.'
The road map said the Government is also examining how to hold 'small weddings'. However, there is no reference in the material to foreign holidays - suggesting they are off the agenda for a long time to come. 
Speaking to MPs this afternoon, Mr Johnson said: 'Our challenge now is to find a way forward that preserves our hard-won gains while easing with the burden of lockdown. And I will be candid with the House, this is a supremely difficult balance to strike.
'There could be no greater mistake than to jeopardise everything we've striven to achieve by proceeding too far and too fast.
'We will be driven not by hope or economic revival as an end in itself, but by data and science and public health.'
Sir Patrick Vallance, England's chief scientific adviser, said experts were confident the measures announced by the UK Government would not increase the rate of transmission of coronavirus.
'From a scientific point of view, the review was happy that the first wave of proposals were unlikely to push R above one,' he told reporters during a briefing.
'And then it needs to be monitored very carefully thereafter.' 
Addressing the new advice which allows more outdoor contact, Professor Chris Whitty, chief medical officer for England, said: 'There is a little bit of room for manoeuvre, the numbers are going down.
'We are confident the R is below one already, that's the first bit of background to this.
'Secondly we are confident that the risk of being outdoors, in terms of meeting people, provided it is with social distancing, is significantly lower than that of indoors.
'We are confident these quite small changes will not have a material affect, on their own, provided people stick to the social distancing and the rules that are there, on increasing the R beyond where we are at the moment.' 
Prof Chris Whitty said the changes to the Government guidelines for England were about making 'sustainable' alterations for the long term.
'There are clear benefits to making this sustainable,' he told reporters.
'We have to do this for the long haul, it is really important to understand that.
'Taking a very small risk for something which manages to make it more sustainable for people to do has some clear benefits.
'We are not claiming there are no risks in this but what we think is that they are very small and proportionate to the advantage of overall wellbeing, exercise leading to good health and sustainability.'
In a grim foreword to the plan, the PM said 'we must acknowledge that life will be different, at least for the foreseeable future'. Mr Johnson warned that a vaccine was the main long-term way out of the crisis, but the plan cautioned that 'it is possible a safe and effective vaccine will not be developed for a long time (or even ever)'. 
Earlier, the government's stance was thrown into confusion as Dominic Raab was forced to clarify Mr Johnson's call in a speech last night for millions of workers to return to duties immediately.
The Foreign Secretary insisted the government is not urging workers to return until Wednesday, despite No10's official press release on the PM's TV address saying they should go back today. 
The comment, when many will have already been on their way by road or public transport, came as it emerged that health and safety guidance for businesses will not be issued until tomorrow - 24 hours before the back to work edict now comes into force.   
Mr Raab spread more turmoil by suggesting that people can meet two relatives such as parents in parks while maintaining social distancing, sending Downing Street scrambling to say that is not in fact the case. 
He also got in a muddle and suggested that pubs could open as early as June - when the PM said it would be no earlier than July. 
Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the Government's strategy to ease the lockdown was already 'unravelling' within hours of it being announced - while Unite union baron Len McCluskey stoked up class war rhetoric by saying ministers were 'recklessly' telling manual labourers to risk their own safety while the wealthy stay at home. 
Meanwhile, Nicola Sturgeon demanded that Mr Johnson stop telling Scots what to do, saying she would ban the new 'stay alert' public information campaign from being aired north of the border because the 'vague' words could put lives at risk.  
On another turbulent day as the government's plans threatened to descend into a shambles: 
  • New analysis has suggested people working in social care, including care workers and home carers, along with bus drivers and security guards have 'significantly' higher death rates involving Covid-19 than the working population as a whole; 
  • Despite the 'road map' being published, guidance for health and safety in workplaces will not be released until tomorrow;
  • Mr Johnson will be grilled in the Commons this afternoon and address a public event tonight, but is not expected to front a daily No10 press conference; 
  • The viewing figures for Mr Johnson's big speech were 27.49million last night, higher than the 27.1million for his original lockdown announcement and more than the 23.3million for the Queen. It was the eighth most-watched programme in British history;  
  • British Airways has warned that the 14-day quarantine rule for arrivals in the UK could mean it does not start flights in July as expected; 
  • Jury trials in England and Wales are to resume from next week, the Lord Chief Justice Lord Burnett has announced;   



Construction workers in the City of London today after Mr Johnson ordered more people to go back to their duties
Construction workers in the City of London today after Mr Johnson ordered more people to go back to their duties
Passengers at Canning Town on the busy platform in east London as Mr Johnson was accused of being vague
Passengers at Canning Town on the busy platform in east London as Mr Johnson was accused of being vague
The old 'stay home' slogan with a red edging
The new 'stay alert' slogan has green edging
The PM has dropped the 'stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives' slogan in favour of a 'stay alert' version in England - which notably has green edging instead of red
STEP ONE
Work 
From Wednesday, a series of tweaks will be implemented in England - although the rules in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will not necessarily be the same.
The document said that people should work from home 'wherever possible' for the 'foreseeable future', to 'minimise the number of social contacts across the country'.
In an attempt to blow away any stigma for those who do carry on doing their jobs, the plan said: 'All those who work are contributing taxes that help pay for the healthcare provision on which the UK relies. 
'People who are able to work at home make it possible for people who have to attend workplaces in person to do so while minimising the risk of overcrowding on transport and in public places.' 
But even if they cannot work from home, most people are now being 'actively encouraged' to go back.  
'The only exceptions to this are those workplaces such as hospitality and non-essential retail which during this first step the Government is requiring to remain closed,' the blueprint said.
The plan said 'COVID-19 Secure' guidelines will be produced this week, but merely stated that businesses should follow these 'as soon as practicable' - leaving a considerable degree of uncertainty about how and when workers can be reassured about safety.
Anyone who displays symptoms should isolate as was advised before.
Schools
The document admits that the 'rate of infection remains too high' to allow reopening of schools 'for all pupils'.
But it insisted that there is a 'large societal benefit' from vulnerable children and the offspring of key workers attending school. 'Local authorities and schools should therefore urge more children who would benefit from attending in person to do so,' it added.
The Government is also amending its guidance to allow for nannies and childminders, saying it will 'enable more working parents to return'.
Travel
The plan stressed that 'most journeys to work involve people travelling either by bike, by car or on foot'.
But it conceded that public transport is critical, 'particularly in urban centres and at peak times'.
The blueprint said 'everybody (including critical workers) should continue to avoid public transport wherever possible', instead cycling, walking or driving.  
Moves are under way to widen pavements, create pop-up cycle lanes, and close some roads in cities to traffic to enable other social-distancing friendly transport methods.
Face coverings 
The document said in this stage face coverings will help people avoid transmitting the disease to others if they have it without any symptoms.
It added that homemade cloth face-coverings can help reduce the risk, but surgical masks or respirators should continue to be reserved for healthcare workers.
Ministers added that face coverings should not be used by children aged under two or those with respiratory conditions.
People who may find it difficult to manage the masks correctly such as primary age children unassisted are also advised not to wear them.
Officials said the new guidance was being issued in response to there being 'more movement outside people's immediate household' as people start returning to work.
Public spaces
In a loosening that will come as a huge relief in England, the once-a-day restriction on exercise is being lifted.
You can spend time outside with one other person outside your household, as long as you stay two metres apart. This means tennis or golf with another person is now allowed. 
However, team sports are still off limits, as are playgrounds and outdoor gyms. 
People may travel as far as they want to get to outdoor spaces, and are permitted to stop and sunbathe as long as they keep two metres from anyone not in their own household.
That means, for example, people can drive to the beach and park, before sunning themselves.  
In acknowledgement of the widening splits across the UK, the document noted that 'it is important that people respect the rules in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and do not travel to different parts of the UK where it would be inconsistent with guidance or regulations'. 
The plan noted: 'These measures may come with some risk; it is important that everyone continues to act responsibly, as the large majority have done to date. The infection rate will increase if people begin to break these rules and, for example, mix in groups in parks, which will trigger the need for further restrictions.'
Tougher fines, of up to £3,200 are being introduced to help enforce the increasingly complex rules.  
Travel
As the outbreak subsides in the UK, there will be action to prevent 'leakage' in from abroad.  
All international arrivals will need to supply contact and accommodation information. 'They will also be strongly advised to download and use the NHS contact tracing app,' the document said.
'Second, the Government will require all international arrivals not on a short list of exemptions to self-isolate in their accommodation for fourteen days on arrival into the UK.'
However, there is no deadline for these measures to be introduced, with the plan merely saying 'as soon as possible'.
STEP TWO 
Schools and shops reopen and 'family bubbles' allowed
Step Two will not be implemented until June 1 at the earliest and the Government will give at least 48 hours notice that changes are to be made.
The biggest measure for families across Britain is the prospective return to school and nursery of thousands of children.
Teachers have been told to prepare to reopen their doors on June 1, with reception, year one and year six pupils the first to go back, in smaller classes.
The strategy said that the ambition is for all primary school children to return to school before the summer holidays for a month 'if feasible' - but this will be kept under review.
Secondary schools and further education colleges should prepare to begin some 'face-to-face contact' with Year 10 and 12 students who have key exams next year.
However, ministers face a potential problem in the shape of reticent teachers and parents. More than 380,000 people have signed a petition urging the Government to give parents a choice on sending their children back to school if they reopen next month.
And Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), said: 'Parents are quite rightly concerned about the risks to their children, not just at school but on their daily journeys to and from school.
'This in turn threatens the safety of adults in the school community: parents, families, teachers, heads and support staff.
'Social distancing for younger children will be difficult to achieve and for others there will be the issues of narrow corridors and classrooms that just aren't big enough to allow social distancing.'
In response to parents, the Government announced that fines usually levelled for truanting would not apply if parents did not send their children back to school.
Step two would also allow the creation of 'family bubbles'. The idea is that two branches of a family could be allowed to socialise together, allowing things like grandparents access to see their grandchildren and visa versa. 
Sage has been asked to look at ways of making this possible, with more information nearer the time, with the guidance saying: 'The intention of this change would be to allow those who are isolated some more social contact, and to reduce the most harmful effects of the current social restrictions, while continuing to limit the risk of chains of transmission. 
'It would also support some families to return to work by, for example, allowing two households to share childcare.'
Further proposals are being looked at for larger groups to gather to allow weddings to go ahead with small congregations. 
Stage two would also allow for the return of sporting and cultural events, albeit behind closed doors.
A slew of events including Glastonbury, Wimbledon and the British Grand Prix have already been cancelled and are unlikely to be resurrected this year.
But the plans to allow 'cultural and sporting events to take place behind closed-doors for broadcast, while avoiding the risk of large-scale social contact', would allow professional sports like football, rugby and cricket to resume in early summer.
This would also coincide with the reopening of the UK high street. Non-essential retailers, who have been closed since March at huge cost to the taxpayer, are expected to open in phases from June 1.
Rather than one flinging open of doors the Government warned it will be done in phases and that bars, pubs and restaurants, and 'personal care' like hairdressers and beauty salons, will remain closed because of the higher risk of infection.  
Because of the expected increase in movement during this phase, it will also see more public transport return.
Buses and trains have been operating a limited service since march because demand fell off a cliff. 
Step three 
Something approaching normal - but some businesses could still be stuck in limbo
Stage three is not expected to come into force until July 4, US Independence Day, at the earliest. 
Plans would include the reopening of businesses that were still closed: pubs, restaurants and hotels, hairdressers and beauty salons, churches and lesiure facilities like cinemas,.
But there is still a caveat at this stage that some places will not be able to open.
'Some venues which are, by design, crowded and where it may prove difficult to enact distancing may still not be able to re-open safely at this point, or may be able to open safely only in part,' it warns,
'Nevertheless the Government will wish to open as many businesses and public places as the data and information at the time allows.'
It adds that it will watch places around the world that are already emerging from their lockdown and use them as guide as to how premises could open safely.
But it does raise the possibility that some  businesses will potentially still have their doors closed heading in to the autumn, raising the spectre of job losses over the summer.
Ms Sturgeon has been insisting that Scotland will keep the 'stay home' branding and said the England public information campaign will not be aired north of the border
Ms Sturgeon has been insisting that Scotland will keep the 'stay home' branding and said the England public information campaign will not be aired north of the border
The government issued a series of graphics last night to illustrate the potential path out of the coronavirus lockdown
The government issued a series of graphics last night to illustrate the potential path out of the coronavirus lockdown
In the crucial speech, Mr Johnson said: 'It is thanks to your effort and sacrifice in stopping the spread of this disease that the death rate is coming down and hospital admissions are coming down. 
'Thanks to you we have protected our NHS and saved many thousands of lives.'
Mr Johnson warned that 'now is not the time' to lift the lockdown entirely, saying: 'We must stay alert. We must continue to control the virus and save lives.'
'We must continue to control the virus and save lives,' he said.
'And yet we must also recognise that this campaign against the virus has come at colossal cost to our way of life.
'We can see it all around us in the shuttered shops and abandoned businesses and darkened pubs and restaurants.
'And there are millions of people who are both fearful of this terrible disease, and at the same time also fearful of what this long period of enforced inactivity will do to their livelihoods and their mental and physical wellbeing.
'To their futures and the futures of their children. So I want to provide tonight - for you - the shape of a plan to address both fears.
'Both to beat the virus and provide the first sketch of a road map for reopening society.
He went on: 'From this Wednesday we want to encourage people to take more and even unlimited amounts of outdoor exercise.'
'You can sit in the sun in your local park, you can drive to other destinations, you can even play sports but only with members of your own household.'
He added: 'You must obey the rules on social distancing and to enforce those rules we will increase the fines for the small minority who break them.'
Mr Johnson said guidance will be issued to show how workplaces can become 'Covid Secure', amid threats from unions that staff will simply refuse to go back if their health and safety is not protected.
'The first step is a change of emphasis that we hope that people will act on this week,' Mr Johnson said.
'We said that you should work from home if you can, and only go to work if you must.
'We now need to stress that anyone who can't work from home, for instance those in construction or manufacturing, should be actively encouraged to go to work.
'And we want it to be safe for you to get to work. So you should avoid public transport if at all possible – because we must and will maintain social distancing, and capacity will therefore be limited.
'So work from home if you can, but you should go to work if you can't work from home.' 
Mr Johnson sought to play down the splits within the union, portraying himself as the PM of the United Kingdom, after the backlash from Ms Sturgeon, and her Welsh and Northern Irish counterparts Mark Drakeford and Arlene Foster. 
'I have consulted across the political spectrum, across all four nations of the UK,' he said. 'And though different parts of the country are experiencing the pandemic at different rates.
'And though it is right to be flexible in our response, I believe that as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, there is a strong resolve to defeat this together.
He said at the Cobra meeting yesterday there was a 'general consensus on what we could do'.
'And I stress could,' he said. 'Because although we have a plan, it is a conditional plan.'
Mr Johnson said while the country is through the initial peak, 'it is coming down the mountain that is often more dangerous.' 
He added: 'We have a route, and we have a plan, and everyone in Government has the all-consuming pressure and challenge to save lives, restore livelihoods and gradually restore the freedoms that we need.' 
Mr Johnson said the country will 'come back from this devilish illness' and be 'stronger and better than ever before'. 
'And though the UK will be changed by this experience, I believe we can be stronger and better than ever before,' he said. 'More resilient, more innovative, more economically dynamic, but also more generous and more sharing. 'But for now we must stay alert, control the virus and save lives.' 
Government officials said tennis courts and golf clubs could now reopen in England from Wednesday, as long as social distancing measures are enforced. 
Other permitted activities will include water sports and angling. 
People will be allowed to drive to parks or beaches within England - but not to cross the border to Wales or Scotland for leisure activities if different restrictions are in force. 
As long as a two-metre distance is maintained, people will also be allowed to sunbathe or chat in a park with one other person from a different household. 
The premier immediately came under fierce fire from political opponents and unions.
Sir Keir Starmer said Boris Johnson's address to the nation lacked 'clarity and consensus' and raised 'as many questions as it answers'. '
'Well what the country wanted tonight was clarity and consensus, and I'm afraid we've got neither,' the Labour leader said in a pooled interview. 
'This statement raises as many questions as it answers, and we see the prospect of England, Scotland and Wales, pulling in different directions. It's big gap here for the Government to make up.' 
Sir Keir said the PM 'appears to be effectively telling millions of people to go back to work tomorrow' without the necessary guidance. 
'But we haven't got the guidelines, and we don't know how it's going to work with public transport so there's a huge number of questions arising out of this,' the Labour leader said in an interview. 
Sir Keir also joined criticism of Mr Johnson's new 'stay alert' slogan. 'Stay alert isn't clear, most people have been saying what does that mean? So, there's a very, you know, basic issue here about communications,' the Labour leader said. 
Unite assistant general secretary Steve Turner told Sky News: 'To say that you cannot mingle in parks but it is safe to go back to work is ridiculous.'  
Sadiq Khan said he is busy drawing up plans to ease Londonders back to work, but insisted on sticking with the 'stay at home' message.
The Mayor said: 'I urge the Government to continue to work with employers, employees and trade unions to design a proper plan for how we can keep everyone safe as they return to work.
'All Londoners must continue to abide by the rules, and stay home as much as possible, so that we can continue to save lives and protect the NHS.'
Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, CBI director general, said it was the start of a 'long process'. 'Today marks the first glimmer of light for our faltering economy,' she said. 'A phased and careful return to work is the only way to protect jobs and pay for future public services. The Prime Minister has set out the first steps for how this can happen. 
'Businesses are keen to open and get our economy back on its feet. But they also know putting health first is the only sustainable route to economic recovery. The message of continued vigilance is right.' 
Speaking on BBC Scotland, Ms Sturgeon criticised Mr Johnson for failing to make clear he was announcing measures for England. 
'He is the prime minister of the UK; I'm not trying to gainsay that, but these restrictions are in place legally separately in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and therefore we have a duty to take decision in our own jurisdictions about the speed with which we lift those,' she said.
She said it was 'incumbent on him, maybe a bit more strongly than he did tonight, to stress that when he's talking about lifting these restrictions, he's talking for England'. 
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage tweeted: 'I think the big change from this much vaunted Presidential-style address is that I can sunbathe. Was that really it? 
'Never in the field of human statesmanship was so much said to such little effect.' 
The old 'stay home' slogan with a red edging
The new 'stay alert' slogan has green edging
The PM has dropped the 'stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives' slogan in favour of a 'stay alert' version - which notably has green edging instead of red
If R is above one lockdown will need to tighten
Restrictions can ease if R is consistently below 1
The slides from the government try to explain how the changes in the R number will affect the lockdown in the UK


One headteacher expressed concerns about how schools can be reopened for four and five year-olds while maintaining social distancing. 
Bryony Baynes, headteacher of Kempsey Primary School, told the PA news agency: 'I'm slightly flabbergasted. I understand that we need to begin the sense of returning to normality, and I understand that a big part of returning to normal is getting the school back up and going. 
'However, how on earth are we to manage social distancing between reception and year one pupils when most of them are aged four and five? 
'Boris has made a very general statement tonight and then he's gone off and all of my parents will now be clamouring for details. 
'I don't know how to manage that and I don't know how to manage getting the reception class into school and keeping them safe.' 
Patrick Roach, general secretary of the teachers' union NASUWT said: 'Regrettably, the Prime Minister's announcement is likely to provoke confusion and does not address the genuine concerns that have been raised by teachers.  
'The Government's announcement that schools in England might reopen to more children from June 1 risks thousands of schools rushing to make decisions about how best to safeguard the health and safety of children and staff in the absence of any clear national guidance. 
'It is baffling that following the Government's decision to close all schools on public health grounds that the Government now expects individual schools to work out for themselves whether or not it will be safe to reopen on June 1 and potentially put at risk the health of children, staff and the public.' 
Former shadow chancellor John McDonnell tweeted: 'PM's mess of a statement has caused more confusion than clarity, creating worrying uncertainty about the return to work & how safety will be assured, opening up divisions between the UK's nations and displaying a complete lack of clarity about what activities are now allowable.' 
Ahead of Mr Johnson's address to the nation, Ms Sturgeon condemned ditching the mantra that has brought the country to an effective standstill since March 23.
The First Minister said she had not been informed about the change, and insisted the simple guidance would remain in force in Scotland whatever the PM says. Her Welsh and Northern Irish counterparts Mark Drakeford and Arlene Foster also indicated they will keep telling people to stay at home.  
Addressing a briefing in Edinburgh after attending Cobra yesterday afternoon, Ms Sturgeon said the new catchphrase was 'vague and imprecise, adding: 'I don't know what ''stay alert'' means.' 
She warned that 'people will die unnecessarily' if progress against the disease is 'squandered' by 'easing up too soon or by sending mixed messages that result in people thinking it is OK to ease up now'.
One of the government's own advisers, behavioural expert Professor Susan Michie, joined the criticism saying the shift risked 'undermining the good work over the last few weeks'.
In the face of the anger, Mr Johnson posted a fuller version spelling out that people are still being urged to 'stay at home where possible' and 'stay alert' when they do go out.
Meanwhile, there was anger among some senior ministers that parts of Mr Johnson's speech were pre-recorded, before the full Cabinet and Cobra considered the issues. Government sources insisted other elements were filmed after the measures had been considered.  
Mr Johnson claimed the UK is testing 'literally hundreds of thousands of people every day – despite the government failing to hit its daily target for eight days in a row.
In his speech to the nation, the Prime Minister said Britain had made 'fast progress' on testing, even though Number 10 has repeatedly been accused of being too slow to respond to the crisis.
Figures released yesterday showed fewer than 93,000 tests were carried out on May 9, meaning officials haven't met their ambitious pledge of 100,000 a day since May 2.
But questions have been raised as to whether ministers ever met the target, with Health Secretary Matt Hancock accused of fiddling the figures to hit his much-vaunted goal by the end of April.
The new government slides reprise its five tests and show how the R number and transmissions interact with policy
The new government slides reprise its five tests and show how the R number and transmissions interact with policy
How the government's DefCon style five stage alert system for the UK's coronavirus outbreak could work
Mr Johnson tried to play down expectations for the speech earlier, saying the 'descent' from a mountain was always the riskiest bit.   
'That's when you're liable to be overconfident and make mistakes,' he said. 
'You have very few options on the climb up — but it's on the descent you have to make sure you don't run too fast, lose control and stumble.' 
He tweeted an image of the full advice this afternoon, saying: 'Everyone has a role to play in helping to control the virus by staying alert and following the rules. This is how we can continue to save lives as we start to recover from coronavirus.' 
The full guidance says: 'We can help control the virus if we all Stay Alert: by staying at home as much as possible; by working from home if you can; by limiting contact with other people; by keeping distance if you go out (2 metres apart where possible); by washing your hands regularly.' 
But the updated slogan has already attracted a backlash for being much too soft to guard against a deadly and very contagious disease. 
Ms Sturgeon has previously warned that ditching the clear and simple advice will be 'potentially catastrophic'. 
She tweeted she had still not been formally told the PM was changing the mantra. 'It is of course for him to decide what's most appropriate for England, but given the critical point we are at in tackling the virus, #StayHomeSaveLives remains my clear message to Scotland at this stage,' she said. 
She added pointedly: 'STAY HOME. PROTECT THE NHS. SAVE LIVES.' 
At a briefing in Edinburgh she complained that she did not really understand the new mantra in England.
Northern Ireland's First Minister Arlene Foster said the province will stick with the 'stay home, save lives' message. 
Speaking to BBC Northern Ireland radio on Sunday, she said: 'On the whole, the message is to stay at home. We will say we are not deviating from the message at this time.' 
Prof Michie said the new slogan was 'a long way from' being clear and consistent. 'Dropping the 'stay at home' message from the main slogan in favour of generalised alertness may be taken as a green light by many to not stay at home and begin socialising with friends and other activities that increase the risk of transmission,' the UCL scientist said. 
'This could potentially undermine the good work over the last few weeks that has seen impressively sustained high levels of adherence by the public in what for many are very challenging situations.' 
Union chiefs have also threatened that members will be told not return to work unless it is safe to do so, while many Labour figures have criticised the government for its change of policy.   
There were signs early last week that the government was putting together major moves towards easing the lockdown. 
However, the ambitions were scaled back, with Mr Johnson his most senior ministers - Dominic Raab, Michael Gove, Rishi Sunak and Matt Hancock - having thrashed out a limited strategy on Wednesday night, fearing that the country's infection rate is still too high.  
The real figure is reported to be around 14,000 people a day, while the government's target is said to be around 4,000, according to the Sunday Times.  
It has emerged the government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) received warnings that there could be 100,00 deaths by the end of the year if measures are relaxed too far and too fast.  
A study by experts from the London School of Tropical Hygiene and College London modelled different approaches to 'evaluate which were viable and which were not' and reportedly concluded there was 'very limited room for manoeuvre'. 
Policies such as allowing more than one household to mix in social 'bubbles', and reopening schools for more pupils have been put on hold. 
'The view is that the public will forgive us for mistakes made when going into the lockdown but they won't forgive us for mistakes made coming out of it,' an official told the Sunday Times.
Evidence of 'coronaphobia' among the public will have played a role in the decisions, with a poll for the Sun on Sunday showing 90 per cent of Britons oppose lifting restrictions this week. 
Mr Johnson also announced a five-tier warning system, administered by a Joint Biosecurity Centre, to monitor the virus risk around the country and encourage public adherence to the new measures. 
The alerts will range from Level One (green) to Level Five (red), with Britain currently on Level Four.  
It will be administered by a Joint Biosecurity Centre, which will be responsible for detecting local spikes of Covid-19 so ministers can increase restrictions where necessary to help reduce the infection rates. 
Andy Burnham, the Labour Mayor of Greater Manchester, tweeted that it 'feels to me like a mistake to me to drop the clear' stay at home message. 
Dave Ward, general secretary of the Communication Workers Union, said: 'The messaging from this Government throughout this crisis has been a total joke, but their new slogan takes it to a new level. Stay alert? It's a deadly virus not a zebra crossing.' 
However, there was praise for the new message from the Bruges Group think tank. It tweeted: 'The Government's new slogan is good. 
'Green replaces red for a calmer feel. 'Stay Alert' replaces 'Stay Home' and underlines individual responsibility. 'Control the Virus' is a positive message. 
'It's within our power to achieve.' 
An Opinium poll released today suggests the public thinks the UK's response has been worse than other major countries - apart from the US
An Opinium poll released today suggests the public thinks the UK's response has been worse than other major countries - apart from the US

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