Header Ads

Big Apple braces: Tropical Storm Fay is set to batter NYC on Friday and bring flash flooding and sustained 50mph winds for at least 12 hours as system follows same path as Hurricane Sandy in 2012

Tropical Storm Fay, the sixth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, is set to batter New York City on Friday, bringing the potential for flash floods and sustained 50mph winds for at least 12 hours as the system follows a similar path as Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
Fay began to edge away from the North Carolina coast Thursday evening with its sights set on the mid-Atlantic coast and southern New England.
The US National Hurricane Center (NHS) in Miami said in its 11pm advisory that Fay was moving toward the north at about 8mph but was expected to have a faster forward speed over the next couple of days. 
The storm was located Thursday night about 85 miles north, northeast of Cape Hatteras and had top sustained winds of 45mph.
Tropical Storm Fay (path depicted) is set to batter New York City on Friday, bringing the potential for flash floods and sustained 50mph winds for at least 12 hours as the storm system follows a similar path as Hurricane Sandy in 2012
Tropical Storm Fay (path depicted) is set to batter New York City on Friday, bringing the potential for flash floods and sustained 50mph winds for at least 12 hours as the storm system follows a similar path as Hurricane Sandy in 2012
A tropical storm warning was issued Thursday afternoon from Cape May, New Jersey, to Watch Hill, Rhode Island. 
The warning area includes Long Island and the Long Island Sound in New York, forecasters said.
According to forecasters, Fay will undergo slight strengthening into Friday before the center moves inland and weakens. 
'Residents along the mid-Atlantic and Northeast coasts should expect conditions similar to a Nor'easter,' CNN meteorologist Taylor Ward said. 

'Bands of rain and gusty winds will bring the potential for coastal flooding, beach erosion and rip currents from Thursday to Saturday.'
The hurricane center said the storm will produce between 3 and 5 inches of rain along and near its track, creating the potential for flash flooding where the heaviest rain falls.
'This could lead to flooding of low lying, urban & poor drainage areas,' the National Weather Service (NWS) of New York said on Twitter. 
Forecasters said the rain is expected to pick up in intensity in the late morning and early afternoon on Friday.  
According to forecasters, Fay will undergo slight strengthening into Friday before the center moves inland and weakens
According to forecasters, Fay will undergo slight strengthening into Friday before the center moves inland and weakens 
A flash flood watch was already in place for parts of New Jersey as of Thursday night. The National Weather Service (NWS) said a flash flood watch will be in effect starting Friday morning through Friday evening
A flash flood watch was already in place for parts of New Jersey as of Thursday night. The National Weather Service (NWS) said a flash flood watch will be in effect starting Friday morning through Friday evening
The hurricane center said the storm will produce between 3 and 5 inches of rain along and near its track, creating the potential for flash flooding where the heaviest rain falls
The hurricane center said the storm will produce between 3 and 5 inches of rain along and near its track, creating the potential for flash flooding where the heaviest rain falls
A flash flood watch was already in place for parts of New Jersey as of Thursday night. 
The NWS said a flash flood watch will be in effect starting Friday morning through Friday evening. 
A high surf advisory was also issued for parts of Brooklyn and Queens beginning 6am Friday to Friday at 9pm. 
The NWS said that large breaking waves of three to six feet are expected in the surf zone as well as high rip currents.
According to the NOAA's Storm Prediction Center, there is a chance that Fay could cause thunderstorms with brief tornadoes Friday into Friday night from New Jersey to southern New England. 
Fay's formation Thursday means it is the earliest sixth-named storm on record, according to Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach. 
The previous record was Franklin on July 22, 2005, Klotzbach tweeted.
Two named storms formed before the official June 1 start of the hurricane season. None of this season's previous five named storms strengthened into hurricanes.

No comments