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Newly retired University of North Dakota provost is fatally shot 'by two teenage boys during a botched robbery attempt while he was out walking with his wife'

Two teenage boys have been charged in the fatal shooting of a retired University of North Dakota provost during an attempted robbery Friday morning in South Carolina. 
Retired UND provost Tom DiLorenzo, 63, was out walking with his wife, newly-appointed College of Charleston provost Suzanne Austin, when the fatal shooting occurred at about 6.15am in downtown Charleston, South Carolina. 
During the incident, which took place just blocks from the college campus, two men approached the couple at an intersection near an antiques store and demanded money from them at gunpoint. 
DiLorenzo was then shot during the attempted robbery. He was taken to the hospital where he died just before 7am, according to WBTW
Austin was physically uninjured. 
The would-be robbers fled the scene before authorities arrived. 
Antiques store owner Andrew Slotin told WCSC said that after DiLorenzo was shot, he staggered to and collapsed near his store.
I mean a person making a walk, we all love to walk In this great city of Charleston. The last thing you would expect is to have a random act of violence like this,' Slotin said.
Logan Schoembs, who manages the 167 Raw restaurant near the shooting location told ABC News 4 that he saw about five bullet casings at the shooting scene and saw police taking pictures of blood stains and using a K-9 unit. 
Following the shooting, police released pictures of a silver 2005 Acura TL, which they believed was occupied by three males in their mid-to-late teens. 
Late Friday night, Charleston Police issued a statement revealing that they had arrested two teenage boys in connection with the attempted robbery and DiLorenzo's death. 
The suspects were said to be ages 15 and 16. They were not identified due to their ages. 
Authorities said that DiLorenzo and his wife were out walking in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, when they were approached on this street by two men at gunpoint
Authorities said that DiLorenzo and his wife were out walking in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, when they were approached on this street by two men at gunpoint
Neighborhood businessmen said they saw about five bullet casings at the shooting scene
Neighborhood businessmen said they saw about five bullet casings at the shooting scene
Authorities released a picture of a 2005 Acura which they believed was connected to the incident. At the time, they believed the car contained three males, in their mid-to-late teens
Authorities released a picture of a 2005 Acura which they believed was connected to the incident. At the time, they believed the car contained three males, in their mid-to-late teens
DiLorenzo (back right) was walking with his wife, newly-appointed College of Charleston provost Suzanne Austin (center), when the fatal shooting occurred Friday morning
DiLorenzo (back right) was walking with his wife, newly-appointed College of Charleston provost Suzanne Austin (center), when the fatal shooting occurred Friday morning
DiLorenzo had retired from his University of North Dakota provost position, which he held for seven years, just six weeks prior to his death and mere weeks after moving to Charleston
DiLorenzo had retired from his University of North Dakota provost position, which he held for seven years, just six weeks prior to his death and mere weeks after moving to Charleston

Both of the boys have since been charged with murder and attempted armed robbery.
One of the boys was also charged with possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a violent crime. 
The investigation into the incident is ongoing. 
The boys are being held in a juvenile detention center and will have a hearing before a family court judge. 
DiLorenzo retired from his provost position six weeks and had moved to Charleston just weeks prior to being killed, the Grand Forks Herald reported. 
He had been UND provost from 2013 to 2020, working towards student retention, improving the university's graduation rates and developing the school's strategic plan.
Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said in a statement that the city was ‘shocked and horrified’ by DiLorenzo's murder and noted that the violence 'has no place in our city.'
'Our hearts go out to Mr. DiLorenzo’s family and friends, and to the whole College of Charleston community at this terrible time,' he added.
Former University of North Dakota student body president told the Grand Forks Herald that DiLorenzo 'was always so warm and welcoming and ready to listen to the student voice, which I think was so important.
She added that 'He really did care about student opinion on things.'  
College of Charleston’s President Andrew Hsu said in a statement that 'Tom was celebrated not only for his collaborative leadership style, but also his belief in experiential learning and how the city of Grand Forks served as an extension of the UND classroom.' 
'From what I understand, Tom – as you would expect of any lifelong academician – held education in the highest esteem, even calling it the "ultimate equalizer" because he knew that education was the only way a person could take full control of his/her/their life and ensure a future of success,' Hsu added.
'This is a moment of great sorrow for the entire College of Charleston community. In this difficult time, I want to express heartfelt condolences to Suzanne and the Austin and DiLorenzo families. It is imperative that we, as a campus community, come together now to support Suzanne and her family as they mourn the untimely loss of a husband and father.'

12 comments:

  1. He worked in a field that actually denies many from getting an education.

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    Replies
    1. Then, shoot him down in the street.

      Question: What have you done in your life that disadvantaged a protected group? How about any of your ancestors? Shoot you down in the street and ask questions later.

      Delete
  2. but did they get any money?

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  3. When the media says "two boys" you can bet they were "thugs".

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  4. Can we please just start naming the race of the perps again? This practice of not naming the race gives everyone a false sense of everyone being the same regardless of race, we are not. Sorry, look at the criminal stats and you'll quickly figure out that blacks are incredibly violent as a group.

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  5. What a charade. The killers' race is only suppressed when it's black-on-white crime. These stories are so predictable.

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  6. "Some black nigga thugs"? Quote from a rap song. I added the question mark.

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  7. I see the geniuses are out in force in the comments section.

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  8. Two teenage boys?????? So that means they are black. Why not say their race????

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