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Shocking moment one of Vallejo Police's 'Fatal 14' cops shoots dead a man, 22, who was on his knees with his hands in the air, as the officer's cruiser pulled into a Walgreens parking lot while responding to reports of looting

Police body camera footage was released Wednesday of the moment a 22-year-old California man on his knees was shot dead by a 'Fatal 14' officer who fired from the backseat of a moving vehicle while responding to reports of looting.
The footage of the June 2 incident was officially released by the Vallejo Police Department after the family of Sean Monterrosa, 22, was allowed to view the recordings. 
But the video does not show any of the minutes leading up to shooting, sparking more questions than answers for the victim's family after weeks pleading.
'It was quite surprising and shocking to us that there was no video of the actual shooting itself,' John Burris, an attorney for Monterrosa's family, said at a news conference, NBC News reports. 
Burris also pointed out that the department changed their account of Monterrosa's actions before the shooting, did not reveal the death for 24 hours and lack a full video evidence. 
Pictured: Sean Monterrosa, 22, was shot dead by an officer on June 2 in Vallejo, California
Local reports identified as Detective Jarrett Tonn (pictured) as the officer involved in the shooting
San Francisco native Sean Monterrosa (left) was shot dead by a officer with the Vallejo Police Department, identified by local reports as Detective Jarrett Tonn, on June 2

The footage does show the actual shooting, but does not give a view of Monterrosa before he was shot at five times that night over after officers mistook a hammer on his person for a gun. 
The police cruiser did not have any cameras either.  
The department added that the only exterior security camera at the scene was destroyed in a 'previous looting incident' after a reportedly volatile night following protests over the death of George Floyd and other Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement. 

The Vallejo Police Department dispatched three officers to a local Walgreens store after reports of looting and encountered Monterrosa, Police Chief Shawny Williams says in a recorded message accompanying the video.
Williams adds that there was a previous incident at the scene where a police cruiser was rammed and officers reported seeing several 'potential looters' get into cars and flee the scene.
When additional officers arrive to in a pickup truck to the scene, Monterrosa began running towards a vehicle, then stopped and crouched in a half-kneeling position towards the officers, according to Williams. 
An officer told investigators that he believed Monterrosa was armed that night with a gun in pocket and was kneeling 'as if in preparation to shoot.'
This contradicts an initial report that said Monterrosa was on his knees with his hands above his waist 
The Vallejo Police Department released body camera footage of the shooting, but claimed to have no footage of the moments prior
The Vallejo Police Department released body camera footage of the shooting, but claimed to have no footage of the moments prior 
Authorities initially believed Monterrosa (pictured) was holding a gun in his waistband, but later said it was a long hammer found in his sweatshirt pocket
Authorities initially believed Monterrosa (pictured) was holding a gun in his waistband, but later said it was a long hammer found in his sweatshirt pocket 
Pictured: the pickup truck carrying officers with the Vallejo Police Department sits parked near the wounded body of Monterrosa (right)
Pictured: the pickup truck carrying officers with the Vallejo Police Department sits parked near the wounded body of Monterrosa (right)
Pictured: Police body camera footage shows them administering medical treatment, like chest compressions, to Monterrosa's unresponsive body after shooting him
Pictured: Police body camera footage shows them administering medical treatment, like chest compressions, to Monterrosa's unresponsive body after shooting him
However, footage only shows an firing several rounds at Monterrosa from the backseat of the pickup truck and through the front windshield. 
It's not until after Monterrosa is lying unresponsive and wounded on the concrete that the officer in question, identified as Detective Jarrett Tonn by local reports, questions if the victim was armed. 
'What did he point at us?' says Tonn, according to footage. 
'I don't know, man,' another officer responds.
Tonn, as if trying to convince himself and his colleagues, then exclaims: 'Hey, he pointed a gun at us!'
Officers then shout at Monterrosa's still body 'don't move'  and 'Put your hands out' as they exit their vehicles and approach the victim.
According to police footage, Tonn shot five times at Monterrosa from the backseat of a police cruiser (pictured)
According to police footage, Tonn shot five times at Monterrosa from the backseat of a police cruiser (pictured)
After shooting Monterrosa, Tonn is heard asking his colleagues 'What did he point at us?'
After shooting Monterrosa, Tonn is heard asking his colleagues 'What did he point at us?'
They then grab a medical kit from the vehicle and begin administering chest compressions.
Later, Tonn can be heard speaking to another officer and admitting 'I though that ax was a gun.'  
The uncertainty of Tonn's response is cause for worry and suggests no proper motivation for lethal force,' Burris said, 
'Any time a life is lost, it's tragic, and our thoughts are with Mr. Monterrosa's family at this time,' said Williams in a final message. 
An investigation into the case is ongoing and Tonn, a police veteran of 18 years, was placed on administrative leave.  
Burris said that without seeing Monterrosa's actions before the shooting, the police departments justification of using fatal force validated and that the young man could have been in the midst of surrendering.
Authorities said they spotted several 'potential looters' outside a Vallejo Walgreens after a night of volatile clashes and looting took place in June
Authorities said they spotted several 'potential looters' outside a Vallejo Walgreens after a night of volatile clashes and looting took place in June
Monterrosa is the 18th resident killed by the Vallejo Police Department in a police-involved shooting since 2010
Monterrosa is the 18th resident killed by the Vallejo Police Department in a police-involved shooting since 2010
Burris: 'We want to know whether it's a police officer's imagination that justified the shooting or that there's some real evidence to support that'
Burris: 'We want to know whether it's a police officer's imagination that justified the shooting or that there's some real evidence to support that'
'We want to know whether it's a police officer's imagination that justified the shooting or that there's some real evidence to support that,' Burris told NBC News.
Monterrosa's death comes as pressure against law enforcement mounts nationwide over allegations of repeated police brutality, racial profiling and excessive use of force. 
A reexamination into the role, and overall policing, of law enforcement has divided the United States as the Trump administration and liberal politicians take sides.
Trump has unequivocally sided with law enforcement, oftentimes using rhetoric described by many as inflammatory and racist.  
Monterrosa's family and police brutality protesters repeatedly called for body camera footage of the incident to be released, but did not receive anything from authorities until a month later.

The Vallejo Police Department, just 30 miles from Monterrosa's home in San Francisco, was the subject of dozens of lawsuits over excessive force and overly forceful policing.
In one case, four officers were seen on body camera footage attacking an unarmed white man with punches, kicks and batons as he screamed 'I didn't do anything!'
Open Vallejo, an independent and nonpartisan public interest newsroom, reported that Tonn was involved in at least three other shootings dating between 2015 and 2017. 
In those instances, victims  Gerald Brown and Kevin DeCarlo suffered gunshot wounds. Victor Hurtado, a third victim, was shot at but avoided injury.  
Tonn has become one of 14 officers whom residents call the 'Fatal 14' because they've repeatedly shot and killed civilians.  
Monterrosa's death is the 18th fatal police shooting since 2010, and the majority of victims were Black and brown men.  
His sisters have been vocal in their questioning of the Vallejo police, which they said misrepresented the timeline of Monterrosa's death.
An initial press release failed to explain that Monterrosa was dead, and Chief Williams did not disclose that fact until the next afternoon during a press conference.
According to Monterrosa's family, he was confirmed dead about one hour after he was admitted to a local hospital for treatment.
'The department worked as quickly as reasonably possible to gather accurate information from the initial phases of the investigation to share with the public,' the department said on it's website.
Echoing the family's concerns, Burris told The Guardian that department's shifting narrative of the incident was indicative of their embattled past.
'The Vallejo police union concocted a different scenario once they knew there was no tape,' said Burris.
'This is what happens with police departments and in Vallejo.'
Additionally, the police department never released any evidence indicating that Monterrosa was engaged in any criminal activity that night. His sisters don't know what he was doing in Vallejo.
Before Monterrosa's death, the California Department of Justice spoke with Vallejo officials to implement an 'extensive review' of the police department.  
CA Assemblymember Timothy S. Grayson, representing District 14, said in a statement that he requested a private investigation into the matter.
'Regardless of the circumstances, it is absolutely unacceptable that the public was forced to wait over 24 hours to learn of the conditions of those involved in the shooting,' he said. 
Pictured: A memorial to Sean Monterrosa, George Floyd and other victims of police violence is seen at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California
Pictured: A memorial to Sean Monterrosa, George Floyd and other victims of police violence is seen at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California
CA Assemblymember Timothy S. Grayson relesed a statement calling for an independent investigation into the shooting (pictured)
CA Assemblymember Timothy S. Grayson relesed a statement calling for an independent investigation into the shooting (pictured)
But Attorney General Xavier Becerra declined to investigate the matter and left it to the Solano County District Attorney's Office to decide with Tonn woudl face charges. 
District Attorney Krishna Abrams recused her office from the investigation as well. 
'As our attorney general has said himself, when our communities speak up we must listen … I too am listening and hearing their pleas for an independent investigation,' said Abrams.
GoFundMe campaign has been set up to help Monterrosa's family pay for funeral expenses.  

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