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This has been a long-time coming: How civil rights leaders grew tired of Mark Zuckerberg 'talking down' to them and persuaded firms to STOP advertising with Facebook after he refused to censure Donald Trump's posts

Civil rights leaders have spoken out about how they tired of Mark Zuckerberg 'talking down' to them, leading them to persuade firms to stop advertising with Facebook. 
'You can't reason with the guy,' Derrick Johnson, president of the NAACP, one of the groups in the coalition behind the boycott, told Politico this week. 
'[Facebook] is a breeding ground for racial hate groups.' 
More than 800 brands including Coca-Cola, Starbucks and now Lego have so far pulled advertising from the social media giant, following the 'Stop Hate for Profit' campaign launched by a number of civil rights groups last month. 
The groups enlisted the help of the multinational corporations to pressure Facebook into implementing new policies to help block hate speech in the wake of the death of George Floyd's 'murder' and amid a national reckoning over racism. 
It is estimated the boycott will only put a dent in the company's fortune, with Bloomberg predicting it will cost Facebook just $250 million of its $77 billion annual sales. 
However, with 98 percent of its revenue coming from ads and the company's share price already plummeting in the last week, the toll could be far greater.   
Civil rights leaders have spoken out about how they tired of Mark Zuckerberg 'talking down' to them, leading them to persuade firms to stop advertising with Facebook 
Leaders of the civil rights groups behind the boycott have now said the action has been in the pipeline ever since Donald Trump won the race for the White House in 2016.
However, the issue really came to the fore in response to Floyd's death and the subsequent protests. 

On May 29, Trump posted a Tweet that appeared to incite violence against the protesters demanding justice for Floyd's death. 
'Any difficulty and we will assume control, but when the looting starts, the shooting starts,' he tweeted.    
Twitter placed warning labels on some of the president's tweets that it deemed abusive or threatening, and unlike Facebook, Twitter banned all political campaign ads.
'You can't reason with the guy,' Derrick Johnson, president of the NAACP, one of the groups in the coalition behind the boycott, told Politico this week. '[Facebook] is a breeding ground for racial hate groups'
'You can't reason with the guy,' Derrick Johnson, president of the NAACP, one of the groups in the coalition behind the boycott, told Politico this week. '[Facebook] is a breeding ground for racial hate groups'
Leaders of the civil rights groups behind the boycott have said the Facebook boycott has been in the pipeline ever since Donald Trump won the race for the White House in 2016
Leaders of the civil rights groups behind the boycott have said the Facebook boycott has been in the pipeline ever since Donald Trump won the race for the White House in 2016
Unilever
Verizon
Hundreds of companies including Unilever (left) and Verizon (right) have said they will not buy advertising

Zuckerberg slammed the move when Twitter first labeled a Trump tweet, saying it wasn't up to social media companies to be the 'arbiters of truth'.
'When Mark Zuckerberg criticized Jack Dorsey for that, we realized we had even more of a serious problem than we thought,' Johnson told Politico. 
Zuckerberg then held a conference call with civil rights leaders about Facebook's preparation for the 2020 election on June 1 - something that was already scheduled prior to the events leading up to it. 
Johnson told Politico Zuckerberg was 'trying to talk down one of the most important voting rights litigators in the country' in the call when he argued with president of the NAACP's Legal Defense and Educational Fund Sherrilyn Ifill over Trump's tweets. 
Rashad Robinson, executive director of one of the other groups Color of Change, told Politico this was the turning point where he said: 'I don't understand why I keep coming to these meetings with you.'
Color of Change began mulling a boycott and, at the same time, the leaders of Common Sense Media, Sleeping Giants, Common Sense and the Anti-Defamation League were also having conversations about pushing for a one-month Facebook ad boycott.
The groups - as well as Mozilla, the NAACP, Free Press and, later, the League of United Latin American Citizens the National Hispanic Media Coalition - all joined forces to take on the social media giant.  
'We felt like, 'What else do we have to lose here?' Johnson said. 
'We've been speaking out and meeting with the company to no avail. We thought, 'We need to do something.'  
The group planned the ad boycott and just before its launch organizers were given a surprise boost by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi who said in an online event on June 16 that 'advertisers have tremendous leverage' over Facebook.  
StopHateForProfit then launched on June 17 and Sleeping Giants tweeted the #StopHateForProfit hashtag to its more than 300,000 followers, calling on them to join. 
North Face became the first company to join the boycott on June 19 and was quickly joined by the likes of Dove, Honda and Ben & Jerry's.  
Shares in the platform crashed to their lowest in three months as hundreds added to the boycott. 
This dealt a hefty $7.2 billion blow to Zuckerberg's personal fortune, pushing him down from third to fourth place on Bloomberg Billionaires Index and leaving him with a new net worth of $82.3 billion.   
The coalition has outlined 10 demands for Facebook including 'Find[ing] and remov[ing] public and private groups focused on white supremacy, militia, antisemitism, violent conspiracies, Holocaust denialism, vaccine misinformation, and climate denialism.'
The group has also called for allowing people who experience severe harassment to speak with a Facebook employee and called for the platform to issue refunds to brands whose ads show up next to offensive content that is later removed.  
Facebook executives held at least two meetings with advertisers on Tuesday, the eve of the planned one-month boycott starting July 1, in a last-ditch attempt persuade them to reconsider their course of action.
However, the talks broke down after the executives offered no new details on how they would tackle hate speech, three sources told Reuters. 
Instead, they pointed back to recent press releases, frustrating advertisers on the calls who believe those plans do not go far enough. 
On Wednesday, Zuckerberg agreed to meet with organizers of the boycott in a desperate move from the social media firm to rein back in lost revenue.  
The company has also banned 250 white supremacist organizations from Facebook and Instagram, she said, adding that the company's substantial investment artificial intelligence technology allows Facebook to find nearly 90 percent of hate speech before users report it.
'We know we have more work to do, and we'll continue to work with civil rights groups, GARM, and other experts to develop even more tools, technology and policies to continue this fight,' a spokesperson added.   

4 comments:

  1. There is no such thing as "hate speech"! There is hateful speech that you can disagree with, but it's protected under the 1st amendment. Popular speech is always protected, that's why it's popular. It's the unpopular speech that needs protecting and the NAACP is NOT going to be the arbiter of what other people can say!

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  2. Couldn't help but notice all those organizations are either non-white entities or extreme far left commies. So are we about to see a war between 2 sets of evil in this country? Facebook vs the commies?

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  3. This is a simple economic mechanism - less sales - less advertising is affordable. Besides that who watches advertisements?

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  4. "Civil rights leaders??????" You mean Totalitarian Fascists. That's what they are. That's all they are. They are a stain on the American Republic.

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