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EXCLUSIVE: Youngest ever FBI drug informant 'White Boy Rick', 51, breaks his silence after being released from prison after 32 years, revealing he returned to Michigan to start rebuilding his life and is engaged to high school classmate

Richard Wershe Jr, once the youngest paid informant in FBI history, sensationally walked free last month after 32 years in prison.
As 14-year-old 'White Boy Rick,' he was taught to pedal drugs and was planted in one of the most notorious gangs in Detroit.
He helped bring down dirty cops and drug lords but when he was arrested on drug charges, the system that brought him into a life of crime abandoned him and refused to intervene as he was sentenced to a life behind bars.
Now, Wershe, 51, has broken his silence for the first time since becoming a free man on July 20.
Speaking exclusively to DailyMail.com, he remarkably 'harbors no anger,' but instead revealed his plans to advocate for change in the system that 'treated him rough…chewed him up and spat him out.'
Wershe said: 'I can tell you this, I have more peace in my life now than I've ever had.
'I have been made to feel welcome and accepted. I wasn't sure it would be that way. But a lot of people seem to feel and see I had a rough deal. I go to pay for a meal, and someone recognizes me as ''White Boy Rick,'' and they say, ''I got this''.'
DailyMail.com has learned that Wershe, who served his last three years in prison in Florida, has returned to Michigan to start building the life he never had a chance to start and is engaged to a woman he has known since high school.
Richard Wershe Jr, once the youngest paid informant in FBI history, sensationally walked free last month after 32 years in prison. Now, Wershe, 51, has broken his silence for the first time since becoming a free man. Speaking exclusively to DailyMail.com, he remarkably 'harbors no anger,' but instead revealed his plans to advocate for change in the system that 'treated him rough…chewed him up and spat him out'
Richard Wershe Jr, once the youngest paid informant in FBI history, sensationally walked free last month after 32 years in prison. Now, Wershe, 51, has broken his silence for the first time since becoming a free man. Speaking exclusively to DailyMail.com, he remarkably 'harbors no anger,' but instead revealed his plans to advocate for change in the system that 'treated him rough…chewed him up and spat him out'
As 14-year-old 'White Boy Rick,' he was taught to pedal drugs and was planted in one of the most notorious gangs in Detroit
As 14-year-old 'White Boy Rick,' he was taught to pedal drugs and was planted in one of the most notorious gangs in Detroit
He helped bring down dirty cops and drug lords but, when he was arrested on drug charges, the system that brought him into a life of crime abandoned him and refused to intervene as he was sentenced to a life behind bars
He helped bring down dirty cops and drug lords but, when he was arrested on drug charges, the system that brought him into a life of crime abandoned him and refused to intervene as he was sentenced to a life behind bars
DailyMail.com has learned that Wershe, who served his last three years in prison in Florida, has returned to Michigan to start building the life he never had a chance to start and is engaged to a woman he has known since high school. Pictured: DailyMail.com has learned that Wershe, who served his last three years in prison in Florida, has returned to Michigan to start building the life he never had a chance to start and is engaged to a woman he has known since high school.
DailyMail.com has learned that Wershe, who served his last three years in prison in Florida, has returned to Michigan to start building the life he never had a chance to start and is engaged to a woman he has known since high school. Pictured: The East Detroit neighborhood where Wershe grew up and pedaled drugs as White Boy Rick. He was raised on Hampshire Street (pictured) and Dickerson across the road from his paternal grandparents
But while Wershe is acclimatizing to life on the outside, he told DailyMail.com he is working on plans to use his voice to advocate for prison reform.
He said: 'You tell me how it's right that I served 32 years for a non-violent crime and someone who has raped or killed walks free in a few years.
'Did I do something wrong? Absolutely. But where is the equity in a system that puts non-violent criminals away while killers walk free?
'I'm working to advocate for people who are in the same situation as I was – non-violent offenders who are in maximum security prisons or serving substantial sentences beyond what they should be. Where is the equity in justice? That's what I want to advocate for.'
 You tell me how it's right that I served 32 years for a non-violent crime and someone who has raped or killed walks free in a few years.
For his part Wershe was the longest-serving non-violent juvenile offender in Michigan state's history and was repeatedly denied parole, though he was a model prisoner.
His sentence in 1988 was the result of draconian drug laws introduced in the state at a time when drug crime was rampant in the streets of Detroit.
Possession of more than 650 grams of cocaine carried a mandatory life sentence – Wershe was found in possession of 17 pounds and $30,000 in cash.
His trial made headlines as images of the baby-faced felon appeared all over the news. He was painted as a 17-year-old drug lord, an unlikely mastermind who ran the mean streets of Detroit. His story has inspired books and movies over the years, including one starring Matthew McConaughey and, more recently, documentary '650 Lifer: The Legend of White Boy Rick.'
That documentary laid bare the extent to which the myth of White Boy Rick was a construct of the corrupt public servants on whom Wershe had informed.
Official teaser: 650 LIFER, The Legend of White Boy Rick
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His trial made headlines as images of the baby-faced felon appeared all over the news. He was painted as a 17-year-old drug lord, an unlikely mastermind who ran the mean streets of Detroit
His trial made headlines as images of the baby-faced felon appeared all over the news. He was painted as a 17-year-old drug lord, an unlikely mastermind who ran the mean streets of Detroit
But while Wershe is acclimatizing to life on the outside, he told DailyMail.com he is working on plans to use his voice to advocate for prison reform
He said: 'You tell me how it's right that I served 32 years for a non-violent crime and someone who has raped or killed walks free in a few years. Did I do something wrong? Absolutely. But where is the equity in a system that puts non-violent criminals away while killers walk free?'
For his part Wershe was the longest-serving non-violent juvenile offender in Michigan state's history and was repeatedly denied parole, though he was a model prisoner. But while Wershe is acclimatizing to life on the outside, he told DailyMail.com he is working on plans to use his voice to advocate for prison reform. He said: 'You tell me how it's right that I served 32 years for a non-violent crime and someone who has raped or killed walks free in a few years. Did I do something wrong? Absolutely. But where is the equity in a system that puts non-violent criminals away while killers walk free?'
He was also sold out by his own father, the notorious street hustler and con-artist Richard Wershe Sr (pictured together). Wershe Sr brokered a deal with the FBI when it became clear that information he was providing was really coming from his son
He was also sold out by his own father, the notorious street hustler and con-artist Richard Wershe Sr (pictured together). Wershe Sr brokered a deal with the FBI when it became clear that information he was providing was really coming from his son
2018 film White Boy Rick covers criminal life of Richard Wershe Jr.
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Convicted hitman Nathaniel Craft told documentary makers that Detroit's Head of Homicide Gilbert 'Gil' Hill ordered a hit on the teenage informant because he knew too much about the corrupt links between Detroit's police, mayoral office and the real drug kingpins.
Craft admitted involvement in 30 killings to federal prosecutors but served less time than Wershe.
Meanwhile former drug lord Johnny Curry, who ran the deadly gang that Wershe infiltrated, dismissed the notion that 'White Boy Rick,' was anything but a small-time dealer.
Curry said, 'On a scale of one to 10, I would say White Boy Rick was about a two. He was nowhere near me.'
'I did way more than he could possibly have ever done to get that kind of sentence.'
But, in an illustration of his breathtaking proximity to power and the corruption that went to the heart of the city at the time, Curry was married to the Mayor of Detroit, Coleman Young's niece, Cathy Volsan.
Cathy was 'untouchable' and was provided with police protection on the taxpayers' dime.
But Wershe, who had a brief affair with Volsan while Curry was in prison, eventually found out that he was entirely expendable.
Looking back on his days as an informant Wershe said: 'All I did was what I was asked and all it did was tell the truth.
'I was asked to go out there and get information about some people that were involved in the drug trade, and their connections, and how the drugs were coming in. They got me involved in this. I was a kid. I made poor decisions.'
He was also sold out by his own father, the notorious street hustler and con-artist Richard Wershe Sr. Wershe Sr brokered a deal with the FBI when it became clear that information he was providing was really coming from his son.

Wershe was taught by law enforcement how to pedal drugs and was planted inside one of the city's most dangerous gangs. At the age of 15, he was wearing a mink coat and running with Johnny Curry
Wershe was taught by law enforcement how to pedal drugs and was planted inside one of the city's most dangerous gangs. At the age of 15, he was wearing a mink coat and running with Johnny Curry
Meanwhile former drug lord Johnny Curry, who ran the deadly gang that Wershe infiltrated, dismissed the notion that 'White Boy Rick,' was anything but a small-time dealer. Curry was married to the Mayor of Detroit, Coleman Young's niece, Cathy Volsan (pictured together). Cathy was 'untouchable' and was provided with police protection on the taxpayers' dime
Meanwhile former drug lord Johnny Curry, who ran the deadly gang that Wershe infiltrated, dismissed the notion that 'White Boy Rick,' was anything but a small-time dealer. Curry was married to the Mayor of Detroit, Coleman Young's niece, Cathy Volsan (pictured together). Cathy was 'untouchable' and was provided with police protection on the taxpayers' dime
But Wershe, who had a brief affair with Volsan while Curry was in prison, eventually found out that he was entirely expendable. Convicted hitman Nathaniel Craft previously claimed that Detroit's Head of Homicide Gilbert 'Gil' Hill ordered a hit on Wershe because he knew too much about the corrupt links between Detroit's police, mayoral office and the real drug kingpins. Pictured: Detroit Mayor Coleman Young
But Wershe, who had a brief affair with Volsan while Curry was in prison, eventually found out that he was entirely expendable. Convicted hitman Nathaniel Craft previously claimed that Detroit's Head of Homicide Gilbert 'Gil' Hill ordered a hit on Wershe because he knew too much about the corrupt links between Detroit's police, mayoral office and the real drug kingpins. Pictured: Detroit Mayor Coleman Young 
Over the next few decades, Wershe watched as hitmen and murderers served their time and were released around him. And he languished in jail unable to see his two daughters and son grow up
Over the next few decades, Wershe watched as hitmen and murderers served their time and were released around him. And he languished in jail unable to see his two daughters and son grow up 
Years later Wershe Sr. told an interviewer, 'I took the money. I wasn't doing all that well at the time. And I thought it was the right thing – keep some drug dealers off the street and get paid for it.'
Wershe was taught by law enforcement how to pedal drugs and was planted inside one of the city's most dangerous gangs. At the age of 15, he was wearing a mink coat and running with Johnny Curry.
He told the FBI that Curry had spoken of paying a bribe to a Detroit detective inspector to quash an investigation into the murder of a 13-year-old boy.
Curry later admitted to investigators he had paid Detroit Police Homicide Inspector Gilbert 'Gil' Hill $10,000 to have the murder probe go away.
Wershe was shot in the stomach when Curry suspected him of being an informant. But his handlers sent him straight back into the field in a bluff that served to convince Curry he had been wrong.
Looking back on his days as an informant Wershe said: 'All I did was what I was asked and all it did was tell the truth'
Looking back on his days as an informant Wershe said: 'All I did was what I was asked and all it did was tell the truth'
But in 1986, the FBI dropped Wershe as an informant without warning. As he later recalled they 'just stopped calling,' leaving him with nothing but the skills he had learned on the street. The following year he was arrested on drug possession charges. 
At his trial the judge described him as 'worse than a mass murderer,' though all now admit that the myth of White Boy Rick was overblown by those who stood to gain the most from having him put away.
Wershe Sr tried to get the FBI to help his son but they refused to intervene. According to his former handler Herman Groman, the truth is that the Bureau and the Justice Department did nothing for fear of scrutiny and criticism for recruiting a teenage boy in the first place.
Over the next few decades, Wershe watched as hitmen and murderers served their time and were released around him. And he languished in jail unable to see his two daughters and son grow up.
Speaking to the Detroit News in 2017 Wershe said: 'I've lost a lot of my life to things that aren't true. I was never the drug dealer…who was this huge kingpin. That couldn't be more wrong. I sold drugs for 11 months.'
Addressing Wershe's 'long overdue release,' former handler Groman said recently it's a 'difficult thing for me to process.'
He admitted: 'He was locked up when he was 17 years old for a non-violent drug crime – possession – and largely in part because of his cooperation with the FBI, and more specifically with me, on a major police corruption case, he essentially wound up not getting any credit for that and he ended up spending more than 30 years in prison.'

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