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'It means a lot to people to know their face looks good even though their life is falling apart': NYC's super rich who decamped to the Hamptons are paying $1,500 for Botox, hiring club bouncers to patrol beach entrances and snapping up even MORE mansions

The affluent New York City residents who fled to the Hamptons during the COVID-19 pandemic are spending their days getting $1,500 Botox, hiring security to guard beaches and buying even more mansions.
As the pandemic continued into a seventh tumultuous month this August, the rattled economy and health fears have done little to sway the wealthy New Yorkers who have camped out in the Hamptons.
By May, around 420,000 of New York City's wealthiest residents left and their absence was cemented with the arrival of anti-racism protests in June. 
They've ignored Gov. Andrew Cuomo's pleas - and Mayor Bill de Blasio's  chiding - to return to the Big Apple to help offset the projected $30billion deficit over the next two years.
Instead, Vanity Fair reports that they've been spending money on cosmetic surgeries at the luxurious Topping House spa.
Swarms of wealthy residents fled New York when the city went into lockdown in March and became the coronavirus epicenter of the world. Pictured, the village of Sag Harbor
Swarms of wealthy residents fled New York when the city went into lockdown in March and became the coronavirus epicenter of the world. Pictured, the village of Sag Harbor

Dr. Dennis Gross, a notable New York City dermatologist with an office on Fifth Avenue, told the publication he set up a satellite location in Bridgehampton.
With 30 percent of his clientele already in the Hamptons, Gross told patients in an email that he was limiting services to 'Botox and fillers' when he arrived.
The demand from wealthy patients, according to Gross, was so large that it took only five weeks to clear his waiting schedule.
'It means a lot to people to know their face looks good even though their life is falling apart', said Gross.
'They’re having a harder time figuring out what to do with their hair color.' 
But the Botox and filler treatments don't come cheap and cost anywhere between $550 to $1,550 depending on how many areas are tended.
A demand for cosmetic surgeries, like Botox and fillers, has hit the Hamptons after wealthy New York City residents fled earlier this year. Pictured: Topping House spa in Bridgehampton
A demand for cosmetic surgeries, like Botox and fillers, has hit the Hamptons after wealthy New York City residents fled earlier this year. Pictured: Topping House spa in Bridgehampton 
Dr. Dennis Gross, a notable New York City dermatologist (pictured): ''It means a lot to people to know their face looks good even though their life is falling apart'
Dr. Dennis Gross, a notable New York City dermatologist (pictured): ''It means a lot to people to know their face looks good even though their life is falling apart'
Gross said he only sees two patients an hour, two days a week in a 'controlled, socially distanced environment.'
He added that he enjoys the relaxed Hampton environment compared to the bustling big city.
'It feels like I’m a country doctor. I walk to work in 10 minutes and instead of carrying a doctor’s bag, I carry syringes,' said Gross.  
Meanwhile, some residents have gone as far as to hire security to safeguard certain beach entrances from others.
A private road association in the Dunes in Amagansett, a small district near the ocean, reportedly considered hiring professional security guards to stand at the end of the street and prevent others from reaching the beach using their road.
It's not unusual for street associations to hire teenagers in the summer to make sure private paths are only used by residents, but Vanity Fair reports that the reason this time was to protect residents health.
According to Indy East End, East Hampton recorded 235 cases on Thursday and Southampton had 1,116. 
In the end, the street associated settled on hiring bouncers from a local bar. 
In an email chain, residents reportedly said they were actually helping unemployed residents during the pandemic.
But the hawkish over watch of beaches in the Hamptons were exacerbated when, at the advice of New York officials, several beach parking lots lowered the number of available spots by one third.
One street association in the Hamptons reportedly hired local club bouncers to guard to  private walkways from beachgoers
One street association in the Hamptons reportedly hired local club bouncers to guard to  private walkways from beachgoers 
'People are stressed and fighting for spots,' one resident told Vanity Fair. 
The public health guideline was implemented to cap the crowd size at beaches and promote social distancing as New York continued mitigation efforts. 
Parking space shortages have frustrated Hampton beachgoers who own costly, limited parking permits because the solution has reportedly done little to deter guests. 
Instead, people have just become more creative.
'More people are taking their bicycles,' the same resident added.
'More people are walking on the roads to the beach. More and more people are going in and out of various lots searching for places to park.' 
Last month, the United States economy shrank by 33 percent from April to June in a grim record breaking milestone.  
It was the worst quarterly plunge and surpassed the previous record, a 10 percent drop that occurred during the Eisenhower administration in 1958.
And nearly 1.2million Americans applied for unemployment in the last week after the pandemic caused several jobs to disappear and entire industries shuttered. 
In New York, more than 423,000 cases and 32,000 deaths have been recorded since January.  
In the Hamptons, the rich have caused a surge in the local real estate market by buying additional mansions. 
Several Hamptonites have reportedly been 'compounding,' which mean families buy two or three eight-figure homes on the same street for their family children or family members.

'With so many adult kids leaving the city and moving into their parents’ homes, people feel they need more room,' a Hampton real estate agent told Vanity Fair.
'They can see this could be a long-term gig, having the kids live here with them. I have one client with a $10 million main house buying another one with a whopping price tag next door for the kids…. I have another client who’s trading up—from a $5 million home to a $10 million one.'
The second-quarter report from Corcoran showed closed sales surged 21 percent on South Fork. 
A number of deals totaling to more than $15million caused a 292 percent increase in sales volume in the Village of East Hampton.
'There’s no inventory. We’ve never had a market like this before,' the agent said.
'In every price range: $750,000 to $10 million deals are ending in a bidding war and tears.'
Additionally, well-to-do New Yorkers have reportedly stockpiled on leafy vegetables and other status foods. 
Some residents secured fresh local produce by pre-ordering Community Supported Agriculture vegetable boxes and harvesting memberships.  Items like that can cost up to $1,200. 
'When people started leaving New York City, I read articles about them heading to the Hamptons and hoarding freezers to stockpile food,' one resident said.
'I imagined what it would be like to get a tomato in August,' she said, adding that she spent more than $500 for a summer's worth of items. 
Pictured: Hamptons in the age of the coronavirus pandemic showed people lined up at the IGA Market in Amagansett area in Long Island
Pictured: Hamptons in the age of the coronavirus pandemic showed people lined up at the IGA Market in Amagansett area in Long Island
Private chefs with prepared meals have also been staffed as Hamptonites attempt to dine and feed themselves during the pandemic. 
'I was waiting for a loaf of pickled rye and a $16 thimble-size bottle of olive oil (it looked bigger online), watching a woman fret over two boxes of prepared food she’d ordered,' said one shopper at Carissa’s Bakery.
'"What do I do with it? I plan on eating it in two hours." She was asking the bakery staff what to do with an already-cooked rotisserie chicken…even through his mask, [the clerk] looked confused,' they said.
Last month, residents in the Hamptons were scrutinized by Gov. Cuomo for flouting social distancing orders during a drive-in concert.
'Videos from a concert held in Southampton on Saturday show egregious social distancing violations. I am appalled,' Cuomo wrote on Twitter.   
He added that an investigation will be conducted and 'We have no tolerance for the illegal & reckless endangerment of public health.'
The 'Safe & Sound' charity drive-in show on Saturday had about 500 drive-in parking spots that reportedly sold for up to $25,000 each and welcomed a couple thousand attendees in Water Mill, New York. 
The Chainsmokers play packed gig in Hamptons amid pandemic
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Despite the concert’s design to have 'safe zones' for cars with up to six people, posts on social media showed people leaving their cars, partying together, and dancing without masks. 
Organizers praised the event as a success on social media boasting that guests had temperatures checked and were confined to parking spot areas, but footage of crowds show large groups close together without masks, defeating those safety efforts.
And a source told Page Six: 'There was definitely a section of people in front of the cars that did not adhere to social distancing. But you could really be safe there if you were smart enough and mature enough to do it. 
'You could go from your car and then have your square [of space] and have no contact. I think the intentions were good, but there is no way you can control those kids who feel immortal.'
The concert is now under investigation by New York's health commissioner. 

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