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Man who lived in one of New York's homeless hotels says he understands why residents are furious at the influx of junkies and sidewalk camps to their neighborhoods because it has brought 'crazy to their front doors' (14 Pics)

Musician Sal Salomon became homeless in New York after he spiraled into depression
Musician Sal Salomon became homeless in New York after he spiraled into depression
A homeless man who lived in one of New York City's hotels has spoken out to say he understands why residents are angry with the situation that is bringing 'craziness' to their front doors.  
Sal Salomon, who is in his fifties, was recently staying at a hotel near JFK Airport which is among the 139 in New York City that are being used to shelter 13,000 homeless people. 
He had been living in a shelter but was moved out along with thousands of others to try to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks. 
Salomon became homeless after a stint in prison for stealing a car and after the breakdown of his marriage. 
He is not offended by the NYC residents who are outraged by the influx of homeless on the streets, telling CBS News: 'A part of me agrees with them. Who wants craziness in front of your doorstep?

'Help divert these funds that are going to these private companies, that are just warehousing them, and use those funds for qualified psychiatrists.'  

Salomon said the city should divert funds from hotels and pay for qualified psychiatrists to help the displaced

Some displaced people have been seen doing drugs, urinating and cat calling in the streets, which are free from tourists with a widespread travel ban due to the COVID-19 outbreak.
Some New Yorkers have blamed the rising crime rate on the homeless. However the mayor has blamed it on the coronavirus pandemic and authorities have blamed it on the release of people from jail to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Mayor Bill De Blasio has moved 13,000 homeless people into hotels across the city to stop COVID-19 outbreaks in shelters.
It's costing the city some $2million a night, which they say they'll try to reclaim from FEMA later.
President Trump has ordered de Blasio - who stripped $1billion from the NYPD's $6billion budget to divert funds to housing projects and youth initiatives - to rehire cops. 
Salomon says he became homeless after his brothers, parents and best friend died. He says it ruined his marriage, made him depressed and led to him being displaced. 
He has spent time in shelters in Brooklyn, Queens and Bronx and compared it to being in prison when he was 19 for stealing a car.
He managed to turn his life around by going to college in jail and was pursuing music by the age of 24.
Recalling how he had no idea what was in store for him while growing up in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen neighborhood or while enjoying success with his music, he asked people to think more about how people may have become homeless.
'You see a guy down and out and he's sitting down, he may be hungry. He may be depressed. Depression was the number one thing that I saw,' Salomon shared. He has landed an opportunity to sing at a local bar twice a week and is hopeful about the future. 


Some New Yorkers have blamed the rising crime rate on the homeless. However police have put that down to the release of people from jail due to COVID-19
Some New Yorkers have blamed the rising crime rate on the homeless. However police have put that down to the release of people from jail due to COVID-19
A homeless encampment along Broadway and Franklin Street in lower Manhattan sits abandoned as the city grapples with numerous make shift shelters popping up over recent weeks
A homeless encampment along Broadway and Franklin Street in lower Manhattan sits abandoned as the city grapples with numerous make shift shelters popping up over recent weeks
'A part of me agrees with them. Who wants craziness in front of your doorstep?' Salomon said in an interview
'A part of me agrees with them. Who wants craziness in front of your doorstep?' Salomon said in an interview
President Trump has ordered de Blasio - who stripped $1billion from the NYPD's $6billion budget to divert funds to housing projects and youth initiatives - to rehire cops. Some officers are seen huddled in Manhattan on Thursday
President Trump has ordered de Blasio - who stripped $1billion from the NYPD's $6billion budget to divert funds to housing projects and youth initiatives - to rehire cops. Some officers are seen huddled in Manhattan on Thursday
A notice shows that the city has begun a clean-up process, forcing some people to abandon their encampments
A notice shows that the city has begun a clean-up process, forcing some people to abandon their encampments
One homeless person remained on 6th ave and 24th street after the Department of Sanitation cleared away the encampment
One homeless person remained on 6th ave and 24th street after the Department of Sanitation cleared away the encampment
A makeshift tent where a homeless man lives can be seen along Clarkson Street between Washington and Greenwich Street in Greenwich Village on Thursday
A makeshift tent where a homeless man lives can be seen along Clarkson Street between Washington and Greenwich Street in Greenwich Village on Thursday
A homeless encampment along Broadway and Franklin street in lower Manhattan, New York
A homeless encampment along Broadway and Franklin street in lower Manhattan, New York
Reginald Holmes, who is homeless, stands next to a makeshift tent along West 39th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue in Manhattan on Thursday
Reginald Holmes, who is homeless, stands next to a makeshift tent along West 39th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue in Manhattan on Thursday


Homeless men at 6th avenue and west 25th on Thursday night, after the Department of Sanitation cleared out a homeless camp nearby
Homeless men at 6th avenue and west 25th on Thursday night, after the Department of Sanitation cleared out a homeless camp nearby 
There were teams of homeless outreach workers in the streets in Chelsea on Thursday night
There were teams of homeless outreach workers in the streets in Chelsea on Thursday night 
However for many others the outlook isn't so bright.
One homeless person remained on 6th Ave and 24th Street on Thursday after the Department of Sanitation cleared away a makeshift encampment that was setup over the past week.
The camp of up to 20 people on West 24th and Sixth Avenue sprung up early in the pandemic. Residents and business owners complained about the mess and chaos and said it harms their livelihoods.
Bill de Blasio said on July 23 he would address the situation but little appeared to be done.
Another along Broadway and Franklin Street in Lower Manhattan sat abandoned.
Reginald Holmes, who is homeless, stood next to a makeshift tent along West 39th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue in Manhattan on Thursday when photographed for DailyMail.com.
Crime is on the up but de Blasio has stripped the police force of $1billion in response to Black Lives Matter protests.
Some retailers and restaurants have been forced to close permanently and those who are hanging on face continuously changing and difficult rules, like having to sell 'substantial' amounts of food to customers to avoid crowds gathering.


On Friday, after wealthy residents on the Upper West Side took to social media in their droves to complain about homeless people from three of the hotels terrorizing their streets with urinating, loitering and drug-taking, de Blasio said the system was not permanent but would likely continue until there is a vaccine - something that is still months away. 
'The goal here continues to be to deal with the short term which, let's say is six months-ish, while we're dealing with this crisis until people are vaccinated. 
'Once we get out of that, we're going to move out of hotels and go back into the shelter system. We're going to constantly try to reduce the number of people in shelters. 
'We are going to have an opportunity here to be creative and get people into other, better housing,' he said.     
He was asked if the city would consider turning the hotels into permanent housing and answered vaguely: 'There are buildings we control already and that's where we're looking to, or want to control or purchase, where we're looking to do permanent affordable housing.'

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