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New York Gov. Cuomo admits he isn't sure if he'd send his children back to school under NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan - despite the state recording an infection rate below 1% for 14 straight days

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has suggested he's not sure if he would send his children back to New York City public schools when they reopen in three weeks - despite the state recording an infection rate below 1 percent for 14 straight days.
In an interview with NBC's Today on Friday, Cuomo described the reopening of schools in New York as a 'risky proposition'. 
When asked if he would feel comfortable sending his children - if they were still school-aged - back into a classroom next month, Cuomo wouldn't give a straight answer. 
Instead, he admitted: 'I would have a lot of questions'. 
He added that city officials were 'still working out what the plan would be'. 
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has suggested he's not sure if he would send his children back to New York City public schools when they reopen in three weeks - despite the state recording an infection rate below 1 percent for 14 straight days
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has suggested he's not sure if he would send his children back to New York City public schools when they reopen in three weeks - despite the state recording an infection rate below 1 percent for 14 straight days
'This is a risky proposition no matter how you do it, let's be honest. We've seen schools open - we've seen colleges open - and get into trouble in one week. So there's a lot of questions to answer,' he said. 
Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to provide a mix of in-classroom and online learning across New York City from September 10. 
De Blasio has said the district will use a blended learning plan of part remote, part in-person, with a recommendation that students and staff get tested at least once a month, sit six feet apart and wear masks on school buses. 
Cuomo repeatedly said New York state had a low enough infection rate to be able to reopen schools.  
'What I've said from day one is if the parents aren't happy and confident and the teachers aren't confident, then you don't have a school district reopening,' he said. 
'As long as they're smart and safe, whatever a school district wants to do, our infection rate is low right now.'
It comes as New York reported a COVID-19 infection rate below 1 percent for two straight weeks. 
The state also had its lowest hospitalizations since March 16 with 490 patients. Of the 98,880 tests reported on Thursday, 709 - or 0.72 percent - were positive. Three people died from coronavirus across the state on Thursday. 
Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to provide a mix of in-classroom and online learning across New York City from September 10. The Mayor is pictured above on Wednesday with Richard Carranza, chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, at Brooklyn's New Bridges Elementary School
Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to provide a mix of in-classroom and online learning across New York City from September 10. The Mayor is pictured above on Wednesday with Richard Carranza, chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, at Brooklyn's New Bridges Elementary School

The issue of reopening schools has become a controversial one as many are left wondering how to know if it's safe. 
Public health experts say virus rates in the community should be low, but there's little agreement on a specific threshold or even a measurement.
The federal government has largely left it to state and local governments to decide when it's safe to bring students back to the classroom. The result is a patchwork of policies that vary widely by state and county.
New York City teachers on Wednesday threatened to strike or bring legal action unless the largest school district in the US implements a more rigorous COVID-19 testing plan and other safety measures before reopening schools next month. 
The warning by the United Federation of Teachers, which represents the city's 133,000 public school teachers, could delay de Blasio's reopening plan. 
'The minute we feel that the mayor is trying to force people in to a situation that is unsafe... we go to court, we take a job action,' UFT President Michael Mulgrew said during a briefing, adding that a 'job action' could include a strike.
Asked about Mulgrew's comments while touring a school in Brooklyn, de Blasio responded: 'Look, any union leader who talks about doing something illegal should really think twice about what he's saying.'
He was referring to a New York state law that bars public employees from striking or engaging in sickouts.
The mayor said city officials would continue working with the union on the reopening and insisted that all facilities would be safe, adding: 'We're going to keep moving forward to get schools ready for our kids.'
His reopening plan stipulates that all schools will have a 30-day supply of personal protective equipment at all times and schools will close if the percentage of positive COVID-19 tests in the city is 3 per cent or more on a seven-day average. 
De Blasio has said the district will use a blended learning plan of part remote, part in-person, with a recommendation that students and staff get tested at least once a month, sit six feet apart and wear masks on school buses
De Blasio has said the district will use a blended learning plan of part remote, part in-person, with a recommendation that students and staff get tested at least once a month, sit six feet apart and wear masks on school buses
NYC Mayor de Blasio pushes for schools to reopen on schedule
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'We are going to make sure these schools are safe and ready. And if we don't think they're safe and ready, they won't reopen,' de Blasio said on Thursday.
'We work for the parents and the kids of New York City and we owe it to them to get it right, and we will. So, everyone is working together to make sure the PPEs are in place, the signage, the cleaning, the disinfecting, you name it. That work going on literally every single day.
'Some of it is more advanced and technological. Some of it's really old school. Opening up windows. Some school classrooms have windows that were sealed shut. We're opening them up because, what the doctors tell us is fresh air is actually one of the very best ways to fight the coronavirus.'
Compared to de Blasio's threshold of a 3 per cent COVID-19 infection rate for schools to shut down again, the city's positive test rate on Thursday was 0.88 per cent.  
The mayor's school reopening plan 'encourages' teachers to get tested for COVID-19 monthly and promises that the city's testing sites will expedite results for city school staff.
If at least two COVID-19 cases are confirmed in different classrooms at a school, the mayor's plan calls for the school to be closed for 14 days. If one or two linked cases are recorded in the same classroom, then only that classroom must close for 14 days.

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