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Donald Trump rips Steve Jobs' widow for 'wasting money he left her on a failing Radical Left Magazine' by co-owning The Atlantic - which ran bombshell report claiming he called dead troops 'suckers'

President Donald Trump went after the widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, Laurene Powell Jobs, as she owns a stake in The Atlantic magazine, which ran the story that said the president had called U.S. war soldiers and war dead 'losers' and 'suckers.' 
'Steve Jobs would not be happy that his wife is wasting money he left her on a failing Radical Left Magazine that is run by a con man (Goldberg) and spews FAKE NEWS & HATE,' Trump tweeted early Sunday morning. 'Call her, write her, let her know how you feel!!!' 
Trump had shared a tweet from Turning Point USA's Charlie Kirk, a youth conservative activist, that claimed Jobs had donated 'at least $500,000 to Joe Biden's campaign this year.' 
President Trump continued to be outraged over The Atlantic's reporting that he disparaged American troops and war dead. On Sunday morning Trump went after Steve Jobs' widow over her financial stake in the magazine
President Trump continued to be outraged over The Atlantic's reporting that he disparaged American troops and war dead. On Sunday morning Trump went after Steve Jobs' widow over her financial stake in the magazine 
President Donald Trump sent an outraged tweet Sunday morning aimed at Laurene Powell Jobs, who owns a stake in The Atlantic, suggesting that her late husband would be disappointed she was 'wasting money he left her' on a 'Radical Left Magazine'
President Donald Trump sent an outraged tweet Sunday morning aimed at Laurene Powell Jobs, who owns a stake in The Atlantic, suggesting that her late husband would be disappointed she was 'wasting money he left her' on a 'Radical Left Magazine' 
Laurene Powell Jobs photographed at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C. in September 2019
Laurene Powell Jobs photographed at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C. in September 2019 
Laurene Powell Jobs (right) with her late husband Steve Jobs (left), the co-founder of Apple, at the Academy Awards in 2010
Laurene Powell Jobs (right) with her late husband Steve Jobs (left), the co-founder of Apple, at the Academy Awards in 2010 
'We miss him every day.' Steve Jobs' widow speaks out in 2013
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Recode reported in July that Jobs was among the Silicon Valley mega-donors who were giving the max donation, or close to it, of $620,600 to Biden's campaign. 
Earlier in the cycle she gave money to some of Biden's competitors, including Tom Steyer and Andrew Yang. 
A 70 per cent stake of The Atlantic was purchased by Jobs' Emerson Collective in 2017, according to Politico.  
Trump has been infuriated over Jeffrey Goldberg's story about him in The Atlantic, first addressing its contents Thursday night after returning to Joint Base Andrews from his Latrobe, Pennsylvania rally. 
He's continued to tweet about it through the weekend.     
Trump's attack comes after he spent lashed out at another woman in media - Fox News Channel's Jennifer Griffin, who used her own unnamed sources to back up chunks of the Atlantic's reporting. 
'Jennifer Griffin should be fired for this kind of reporting. Never even called us for comment. @FoxNews is gone!' Trump tweeted late Friday.   
After Goldberg first reported anecdotes about Trump disparaging war dead and wounded veterans and not wanting to go to a military cemetery during a trip to France, Griffin matched must of his reporting. 
She confirmed that the president' did not want to drive to honor American war dead' at the Aisne-Marnce cemetery. 
Weather was the president's original excuse for not making the trek.  
An official also told Griffin that Trump used the word 'suckers' to describe those for fought in Vietnam.   
'When the President spoke about the Vietnam War, he said, 'It was a stupid war. Anyone who went was a sucker,' Griffin was told by an unnamed official. 'It was a character flaw of the President. He could not understand why someone would die for their country, not worth it,' the source said. 

US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump greet members of the US military during an unannounced trip to Al Asad Air Base in Iraq on December 26, 2018
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump greet members of the US military during an unannounced trip to Al Asad Air Base in Iraq on December 26, 2018
Veteran Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie joined a long list of officials to discredit the claims made in the Atlantic Article on Sunday.
Wilkie discredited the claims to CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday, saying the president described in the report by anonymous sources does not reflect the Donald Trump he knows.
‘I would be offended, too, if I thought it was true,’ Wilkie said. ‘I am very proud that this president has led to a renaissance in veterans affairs.
‘So what I'm looking at is the Donald Trump that I know; the Donald Trump that has turned around Veterans Affairs from a place that in the Obama administration was 16 out of 17 in terms of best places to work,’ he said. ‘We're now up to six.’
He added that the Obama administration had a 37 percent approval rating among veterans in 2014 and 2015, compared to 90 percent for President Trump.
Wikie's rebuttal comes in the wake of 14 White House staffers, some of whom say they were with the president on the day the alleged comments were made, who also deny Trump has ever said anything disparaging about members of the military.
Among them, was Former acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, who accused Goldberg of entirely fabricating the report.
‘As you all can probably imagine, I have seen more than my share of outrageous (and false) attacks on the President over the last few years. But this whole injured soldiers thing really, really pushes the envelope,’ Mulvaney tweeted Friday.
‘I’ve never heard the President disparage our war dead or wounded. In fact, the exact opposite is true. I was with him at the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Normandy. As we flew over the beaches by helicopter he was outwardly in awe of the accomplishments of the Allied Forces, and the sacrifices they paid.’
Johnny DeStefano, the former counselor to the president, also vehemently denied there’s any truth to the report, writing in a tweet: ‘I was on this trip. The Atlantic bit is not true. Period.’
Veteran Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie (right) has joined a long list of officials in blasting a recent report in the Atlantic that claimed Trump has repeatedly made disparaging remarks about the US war dead, calling them ‘suckers’ and ‘losers'
Veteran Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie (right) has joined a long list of officials in blasting a recent report in the Atlantic that claimed Trump has repeatedly made disparaging remarks about the US war dead, calling them ‘suckers’ and ‘losers'
Wilkie discredited the claims to CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday, saying the president described in the report by anonymous sources does not reflect the Donald Trump he knows
Wilkie discredited the claims to CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday, saying the president described in the report by anonymous sources does not reflect the Donald Trump he knows
Derek Lyons, staff secretary and counselor to the president, and Dan Walsh, former White House deputy chief of staff, have also both disputed the report.
White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany revealed Lyons’ and Walsh’s admonishment of the claims in a Friday press conference in which she read out  statements on their behalf.
‘I was with the president the morning after the scheduled visit. He was extremely disappointed that arrangements could not be made to get him to the site and that the trip had been cancelled,’ Lyons’ statement read.
‘In all my time at the White House, I have never heard him utter a disparaging remark of any kind about our troops. In my view, he holds the brave men and women of our armed forces in the highest regard.’
McEnany then read out Walsh’s statement, which read: ‘I can attest it to the fact that there was a bad weather called in France and that the helicopters were unable to safely make the flight.
‘Overall, the president’s support and respect for our American troops past and present is unquestionable.’
Former national security adviser, John Bolton, who was with the president in France at the time – and has shared a number of high profile fallouts with him Trump - also went on the record to dispute the Atlantic’s report.
‘I didn’t hear either of those comments or anything even resembling them,’ Bolton told Fox News. ‘I was there at the point in time that morning when it was decided that he would not go Aisne-Marne cemetery … It was entirely a weather-related decision, and I thought the proper thing to do.
‘I never heard he made that kind of comment about another country’s forces either, no.’
Fox correspondent John Roberts, who conducted the Bolton interview, added that he has told him, ‘if [Donald Trump] had said he didn’t want to visit Aisne-Marne because the interred heroes were 'losers' and 'suckers,' he would have written an entire chapter about it in his book #TheRoomWhereItHappened.’
Former White House Press Secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, meanwhile, has decried the report as ‘total BS’.
‘I was actually there and one of the people part of the discussion - this never happened. I have sat in the room when our President called family members after their sons were killed in action and it was heart-wrenching … I am disgusted by this false attack.’
 Other protesting staffers include Former Deputy White House Press Secretary, Hogan Gidley, who called the report ‘grotesque’, White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications Dan Scavino, and Jordan Karem, Personal Aide to President Trump.
‘This is not even close to being factually accurate,’ Karem wrote. ‘Plain and simple, it just never happened.’
The rebuttals come as the article’s author, and the Atlantic's editor-in-chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, has defended his decision to keep his sources anonymous and says he expects more information to come out in the coming days to corroborate his story about Trump’s remarks
The rebuttals come as the article’s author, and the Atlantic's editor-in-chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, has defended his decision to keep his sources anonymous and says he expects more information to come out in the coming days to corroborate his story about Trump’s remarks
The Atlantic's editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg told CNN's ‘Reliable Sources’ on Sunday that he expects ‘more confirmation and new pieces of information’ to come out in the coming days and weeks that will corroborate about the alleged incendiary comments.
Goldberg also addressed his use of anonymous sources, which has come under criticism from the president and others who believe that officials should not be allowed to launch bombshell allegations under the cloak of anonymity – particularly in the build up to an election.
‘These are not people who are anonymous to me,’ Goldberg told CNN. ‘We all have to use anonymous sources especially in a climate in which the president of the United States tries to actively intimidate journalism organizations and people who provide information to journalism organizations.’
Goldberg said his decision to publish the article was made confidently, because of the number of sources he had, and their close ties to the president.
‘The formula is simple,’ he continued. ‘What you do is you have to say, does the public's right to know or need to know a particular piece of information outweigh the morally complicated and ambiguous qualities of anonymous sourcing.
‘Most of us, most of the time, don't rely on anonymous sourcing for most things because there are difficulties there. But in this climate, with information that we judge the voters to need, we are going to use anonymous sources because we think the public has a right to know. Especially when you have four or five or six sources, primary sources, corroborating sources, telling you the same thing.’ 

2 comments:

  1. I just do not understand how there can be any doubt about the truth in reporting of Trump’s words about soldiers.

    First, the words almost match the words we all heard him speak in public about the late John McCain a couple of years ago.

    Second, the article’s author is said to have had four good sources. It is of course, perfectly understandable, given Trump’s volatile and threatening personality, why sources would not want to be identified by name. First-class investigative journalism – like that of the great Seymour Hersh – has always had to use some confidential sources.

    Third, portions of the claims already have been substantiated by independent investigation of several major news sources.

    Fourth, the vicious tone is right in keeping with things we’ve learned from Trump’s niece and his older sister, a retired judge, first-hand witnesses both of them.

    People who insist this is a plot or fabrication by “the Left,” just have not thought through what they are saying, just as Trump does not think about what he says.

    Besides, there is no “Left” to speak of in America, and certainly old safe establishment Joe Biden is anything but “Left.” The woman who controls The Atlantic magazine is the multi-billionaire widow of the late Steve Jobs. Hardly a raging Leftist.

    In the end, the question for Americans is that of former television host Phil Donahue when he did some incisive public affairs shows, “People, what kind of country do you want to live in?”

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  2. How much money did Demented Donny EPSTEIN GUILTY Trump waste on girls like Stormy Daniels? Setting up a modeling agency to molest girls? How much has he wasted on PARASITE ISRAHELL ??

    ReplyDelete