Header Ads

Dominion Voting Machines Are At the Center Of Material Data Manipulation Concerns in the 2020 Election – Here’s Some Reasons Why

 

After three reported instances where votes were moved from Republicans to Democrats and another instance where votes disappeared, there is now much concern with the Dominion voting machines and applications used in multiple states in the 2020 election.

We’ve now reported three instances in the 2020 election where votes were removed from Republicans and given to Democrat candidates, including 20,000 votes in Pennsylvania which led to a 40,000 vote swing for Biden.  We also noted at least one instance where the total number of votes counted were decreased by 373,000 in Virginia.  All of these instances occurred in states where the Dominion voting machines are in place.

These instances provide ample evidence of wrong doing.  Yet states across the country transitioned to these voting machines over the past few years.

The Dominion machines are used all over the US:


Speaker Pelosi and Senator Feinstein from California both have an interest in these machines so it is no surprise they are being promoted around the US.  One Board member of Dominion was Obama’s Ambassador to the UE and now is on the Board of WarnerMedia and CNN:

An executive board member of Staple Street Capital, William Earl Kennard, is a former ambassador to the EU who was appointed to that position by former President Barack Obama. In 2018, Dominion announced it had been acquired by its management team and Staple Street Capital. On November 6, Deadline reported that Kennard was named to the board of WarnerMedia parent AT&T, which owns CNN.

South Carolina implemented machines right before the South Carolina Democrat primary where Biden won his first primary ever after multiple attempts at the Presidency.  A local ABC news channel reported in February 2020 on the transition to the Dominion voting machines:

But instead of choosing simple, hand-marked paper ballots that are most resistant to tampering because paper cannot be hacked, many are opting for pricier technology that computer security experts consider almost as risky as earlier discredited electronic systems…

…The most pricey solution available, they are at least twice as expensive as the hand-marked paper ballot option. They have been vigorously promoted by the three voting equipment vendors that control 88 percent of the U.S. market.

Some of the most popular ballot-marking machines, made by industry leaders Election Systems & Software and Dominion Voting Systems, register votes in bar codes that the human eye cannot decipher. That’s a problem, researchers say: Voters could end up with printouts that accurately spell out the names of the candidates they picked, but, because of a hack, the bar codes do not reflect those choices. Because the bar codes are what’s tabulated, voters would never know that their ballots benefited another candidate.

Even on machines that do not use bar codes, voters may not notice if a hack or programming error mangled their choices. A University of Michigan study determined that only 7 percent of participants in a mock election notified poll workers when the names on their printed receipts did not match the candidates they voted for.

Although there have been assurances that voting machines are not connected to the Internet this isn’t the case per a report at NBC earlier this year, noting Dominion as one system that appears to be connected to the Internet:

The three largest voting manufacturing companies — Election Systems &Software, Dominion Voting Systems and Hart InterCivic — have acknowledged they all put modems in some of their tabulators and scanners. The reason? So that unofficial election results can more quickly be relayed to the public. Those modems connect to cell phone networks, which, in turn, are connected to the internet.

The Epoch Times reported moments ago that in Michigan’s Wayne County an observer can attest to the fact that the voting machines there were connected to the Internet:

Voting machines used in Michigan’s Wayne County appeared to have been connected to the internet, according to a sworn affidavit signed by a poll watcher.

At approximately 11 p.m. on Nov. 3, Patrick Colbeck observed an icon identifying an active internet connection on the screens of the computers used to tabulate and adjudicate ballots.

This is where investigators should focus there efforts on the gigantic fraud that occurred in the 2020 election.


 

No comments