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Americans who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 do NOT need to quarantine for two weeks if they are exposed to someone who is infected with the virus, CDC says

 People who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can skip quarantine if they are exposed to someone infected with the virus, new guidelines state.

The updated recommendations, issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Wednesday, apply to the 10.4 million Americans who have received both shots of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine.

The CDC says vaccines have been shown to prevent symptomatic illness, which is thought to play a greater role in the transmission of the virus than asymptomatic illness.    


Officials add that this does not mean people should stop wearing masks or social distancing, just that it is not necessary for them to quarantine for 14 days.

People who have gotten both COVID-19 vaccine doses don't need to quarantine if they are exposed to someone with the virus, new CDC guidance states. Pictured: Educational staff at Kettering City Schools receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Dayton, Ohio, February 10

People who have gotten both COVID-19 vaccine doses don't need to quarantine if they are exposed to someone with the virus, new CDC guidance states. Pictured: Educational staff at Kettering City Schools receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Dayton, Ohio, February 10

The new recommendations apply to 10.4 million Americans, or 3.1% of the population, who are fully inoculated. Currently, an average of 1.5 million people are getting vaccinated daily

The new recommendations apply to 10.4 million Americans, or 3.1% of the population, who are fully inoculated. Currently, an average of 1.5 million people are getting vaccinated daily

The new recommendations say, to avoid quarantine, it must be at two weeks since the person received their final shot. At least 33.7 million Americans have been given at least one dose

The new recommendations say, to avoid quarantine, it must be at two weeks since the person received their final shot. At least 33.7 million Americans have been given at least one dose

'Fully vaccinated persons who meet criteria will no longer be required to quarantine following an exposure to someone with COVID-19,' the CDC wrote in updated guidance on its website

'Vaccinated persons with an exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 are not required to quarantine if they meet all of the following criteria.'   

Despite the new recommendations, the agency has laid down strict criteria for people who would no longer have to quarantine after the vaccinations.

Firstly, people must have received both doses of a two-dose vaccine and it must be at least two weeks since their final dose.

This is because it takes at least two weeks for the immune system to build up a response and for immunity to develop. 


Secondly, because the CDC said it does not know how long protection lasts, officials advise that people quarantine if they received their last shot more than three months prior.

In addition, if people develop any symptoms, such as cough, fever or shortness of breath, the CDC recommends quarantining.

'This recommendation to waive quarantine for people with vaccine-derived immunity aligns with quarantine recommendations for those with natural immunity, which eases implementation,' the CDC said. 

The agency said it will continue to update its guidance as more is learned about COVID-19 vaccines and the protection they provide.

Lastly, all Americans, regardless of vaccination status, should follow mitigation measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


The CDC reminded that it is possible for fully inoculated people to have the virus in their noses or throats and infect others. 

'At this time, vaccinated persons should continue to follow current guidance to protect themselves and others, including wearing a mask, staying at least [six] feet away from others, avoiding crowds, avoiding poorly ventilated spaces, covering coughs and sneezes, washing hands often, following CDC travel guidance, and following any applicable workplace or school guidance, including guidance related to personal protective equipment use or SARS-CoV-2 testing,' the agency wrote. 

The CDC also noted that trial data have shown vaccines can prevent symptomatic illness, but have not yet been shown to prevent asymptomatic illness.

Although people without symptoms can spread the virus, 'symptomatic and pre-symptomatic transmission is thought to have a greater role in transmission than purely asymptomatic transmission,' the CDC said. 

So far, 44.8 million Americans have received one or two vaccine doses, but it's not clear when the U.S. will reach herd immunity.

Biden administration officials told The Daily Beast the nation may not return to some semblance of normalcy until Thanksgiving due to t e current pace of COVID-19 vaccinations and speed

However, Dr Anthony Fauci,  remains 'cautiously optimistic' that if the general public starts getting vaccines by 'April, May, June,' herd immunity could be achieved by fall 2021.

But he admitted he's concerned that variants from the UK, Brazil and South Africa could stretch that timeline in an interview with the Daily Beast.  

1 comment:

  1. What if they are not exposed to someone infected with the virus?

    ReplyDelete