Header Ads

Republicans and Trump's lawyer blast the 'crazy impeachment circus' and say a 'liberal democratic novel is being presented as evidence'

 Donald Trump's defenders were out in force on Wednesday night to denounce the 'crazy circus of the impeachment,' which Lindsey Graham likened to a dystopian novel being written by Democrats as they went along.

The former president's lawyer, David Schoen, described the hearing that began in earnest on Wednesday as an 'illegitimate, unconstitutional impeachment process,' which he said was seeking a conviction based on 'hearsay'.

His allies in Congress - Representatives Jim Jordan of Ohio and Devin Nunes of California, plus Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina - all told Fox News that they process was flawed and Trump had not incited the January 6 insurrection.

Graham told Sean Hannity that the prosecution's case, begun on Wednesday, was 'offensive and absurd.'

Lindsey Graham (right) told Sean Hannity that Wednesday's hearing was 'offensive and absurd'

Lindsey Graham (right) told Sean Hannity that Wednesday's hearing was 'offensive and absurd'

Democrat prosecutors are arguing that Donald Trump, seen on January 6, incited violence

Democrat prosecutors are arguing that Donald Trump, seen on January 6, incited violence 

'We all know what happened at the Capitol was terrible. I hope everybody involved that broke in the Capitol goes to jail,' he said, but added that he was hurt no one cared when protesters gathered outside his own home, in Washington DC on September 21.


'I don't remember any of the House managers saying a damn thing when they were trying to break in my house,' he said.

Graham argued that the Democratic case was nonsensical, because the prosecutors are claimed that Trump knew tensions were high, saw the movement growing online, and encouraged the January 6 riot.

'The managers have got this cockamamie idea, this absurd theory, that Donald Trump was monitoring the Proud Boys and the far right websites and knew it was going to happen, and encouraged it,' said Graham.

'That is looney tunes.'

Graham said that proceedings in the Senate on Wednesday were 'loony tunes'

Graham said that proceedings in the Senate on Wednesday were 'loony tunes' 

Graham argued that the Democrats made the point because if evidence of planning was found, ahead of the insurrection, then that would exonerate Trump from riling up the rioters on January 6 itself.

Graham said they were inserting Trump into the planning phase, to secure conviction.

'They are saying that because if the president didn't know, and it was preplanned, he is not guilty,' Graham said.

'So for the first time today they are trying to create a story line that he was in on it before it happened - that he was monitoring the Proud Boys and other crazy websites and he knew they were coming to Washington with violence on their minds and he encouraged it.

'That is beyond bizarre.

'This is not evidence. This is a liberal democratic novel being presented as evidence.'

Graham added: 'They were planning bombs the night before. So the whole story line that Donald Trump caused this, by the speech, has fallen apart thanks to good law enforcement activity.'

Graham said that he believed 'this thing is collapsing before their eyes.'

He concluded: 'The not guilty vote is growing. So it will be over by Sunday, I hope, for the good of the country.'

Graham, pictured on Wednesday, said he hoped the trial would be over by Sunday

Graham, pictured on Wednesday, said he hoped the trial would be over by Sunday

Jim Jordan (center) and Devin Nunes both appeared on Hannity's show on Wednesday night

Jim Jordan (center) and Devin Nunes both appeared on Hannity's show on Wednesday night

Jordan, seen arriving at Wednesday's hearing, insisted that Trump was blameless for the riot

Jordan, seen arriving at Wednesday's hearing, insisted that Trump was blameless for the riot

Nunes, representative for California, said that the proceedings were a 'circus'

Nunes, representative for California, said that the proceedings were a 'circus'

His congressional colleagues also set out to assure Trump supporters that the hearing was going their way.

Jordan, one of Trump's staunchest allies, argued that Trump was expressing his freedom of speech on January 6.

He said Trump never urged violence, noting he 'specifically said, peacefully and patriotically, make your voices heard.'

And he argued that the trial was unconstitutional.

'Trump came and did and fought for things that Americans care about and now there is a crazy circus of the impeachment,' Jordan said.

Nunes said there was no evidence the rioters were inspired by Trump.

'We should actually interview all of those people and say, did you talk to Donald Trump? Did you talk to anybody in the White House?' he said.

'What is really happening here is you have a radical left in total control of the government now and they don't want Donald Trump to win. They fear his rallies. They fear that 74.5 million people voted for Donald Trump. That is what is really going on here.'

On Thursday the nine House impeachment managers will continue putting their case forward.

David Schoen, one of Trump's impeachment lawyers, is seen arriving in the Senate Wednesday

David Schoen, one of Trump's impeachment lawyers, is seen arriving in the Senate Wednesday

Schoen appeared on Laura Ingraham's Fox News show on Wednesday night

Schoen appeared on Laura Ingraham's Fox News show on Wednesday night

When their 16 hours - which began at noon on Wednesday - are up, it will be the turn of Trump's defense team, comprising Schoen, Bruce Castor and Michael van der Veen.

Schoen, who on Tuesday managed to redeem their team following Castor's widely-panned rambling performance, on Wednesday night refused to preview their arguments.

He said the Democrats were 'clearly playing to the camera, to the public, all the time' and insisted that the 'horrific' riot was not at question.

'They would be thrown out of a courtroom for showing this video,' he said, arguing it was simply to stir up passions without any legal case.

'None of this stuff would be admissible in any kind of court of law.

'They have hearsay, on hearsay, on hearsay.'

Schoen, however, said they were quietly confident, telling Ingraham she would be 'quite impressed with the president's case'.

1 comment: