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US braces for 500K COVID deaths: Somber milestone nears as Fauci says Americans may still need masks into 2022 despite infections falling - as experts say cases could drop so low that vaccine complacency sets in

 The United States stood Sunday at the brink of 500,000 COVID-19 deaths as Dr Anthony Fauci warned that Americans could be wearing masks into 2022 despite infections falling 77 per cent over the last six weeks. 

A year into the pandemic, the running total of lives lost was about 498,000 — roughly the population of Kansas City, Missouri, and just shy of the size of Atlanta. 

The figure compiled by Johns Hopkins University surpasses the number of people who died in 2019 of chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, Alzheimer's, flu and pneumonia combined.


'It's nothing like we have ever been through in the last 102 years, since the 1918 influenza pandemic,' Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, said on CNN's State of the Union. Fauci also said the US will be 'approaching a degree of normality' by the end of the year.

Fauci said Americans may still need masks in 2022 even as other measures to stop the virus' spread become increasingly relaxed and more vaccines are administered, and they may also need a booster shot depending on how variants emerge.   

According to NBC News, some health experts believe that cases will get so low in the summer that many people could decide that 'there's no reason to get vaccinated anymore' before getting hit with another winter surge of the virus. 

The United States stood Sunday at the brink of 500,000 COVID-19 deaths as Dr Anthony Fauci (right) warned that Americans could be wearing masks into 2022 despite infections falling 77 per cent over the last six weeks

The United States stood Sunday at the brink of 500,000 COVID-19 deaths as Dr Anthony Fauci (right) warned that Americans could be wearing masks into 2022 despite infections falling 77 per cent over the last six weeks

A year into the pandemic, the running total of lives lost in the US was about 498,000 as of Sunday evening

A year into the pandemic, the running total of lives lost in the US was about 498,000 as of Sunday evening 


He made the remarks even as cases dip below 77 per cent. The number of COVID-19 cases fell for the fifth straight week as officials scrambled to inoculate the population.

Meanwhile, former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS News: 'This has taken a tragic toll on the United States, but we should be optimistic, in my view. I think we're going to continue to see infection rates decline into the spring and the summer. Right now, they're falling quite dramatically. I think these trends are likely to continue.'

Gottlieb then said that Pfizer and other companies manufacturing vaccines may be able to 'prepare much better for the fall,' especially as it relates to new variants. 


The US virus death toll reached 400,000 on January 19 in the waning hours in office for then-President Donald Trump, whose handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure.

The first known deaths from the virus in the US happened in early February 2020, both of them in Santa Clara County, California. 

It took four months to reach the first 100,000 dead. The toll hit 200,000 deaths in September and 300,000 in December. Then it took just over a month to go from 300,000 to 400,000 and about two months to climb from 400,000 to the brink of 500,000. 

The figure compiled by Johns Hopkins University surpasses the number of people who died in 2019 of chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, Alzheimer's, flu and pneumonia combined. Doctors prepare to treat patients in California on February 17

The figure compiled by Johns Hopkins University surpasses the number of people who died in 2019 of chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, Alzheimer's, flu and pneumonia combined. Doctors prepare to treat patients in California on February 17


The global death toll was approaching 2.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins.

While the count is based on figures supplied by government agencies around the world, the real death toll is believed to be significantly higher, in part because of inadequate testing and cases inaccurately attributed to other causes early on.

Despite efforts to administer coronavirus vaccines, a widely cited model by the University of Washington projects the US death toll will surpass 589,000 by June 1.

'People will be talking about this decades and decades and decades from now,' Fauci said on NBC's Meet The Press.

More than 28 million COVID-19 cases have rocked the US, even as daily average deaths and hospitalizations have fallen to the lowest levels since before the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The virus took a full year off the average life expectancy in the United States, the biggest decline since World War Two. 

While the decline 'is really terrific ... we are still at a level that's very high,' Fauci said on NBC's 'Meet the Press' program. 'We want to get that baseline really, really, really low before we start thinking that we're out of the woods.' 

Less than 15 per cent of the US population has received at least one vaccine dose, with nearly 43 million getting at least one shot and nearly 18 million getting a second shot, US statistics show.

More localities are easing some restrictions, such as on indoor dining, and moving to reopen schools even as millions await their shots, sparking debate over the safety of teachers, students and others.

Financial pressures also continue to weigh even as economists express optimism for the year ahead. 

Congress is weighing Biden's $1.9trillion coronavirus relief package, with the House of Representatives expected to vote on it this week and the Senate seeking to pass it before March 14. 

The White House said on Sunday it planned a memorial event in which Biden would deliver remarks.

A White House spokesman said the president along with first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff would hold a moment of silence on Monday and there would be a candle-lighting ceremony at sundown.

Biden last month observed America's COVID-19 deaths on the eve of his inauguration with a sundown ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial's Reflecting Pool.


Motorists and passengers wait in line for their Covid-19 vaccinations administered by members of the National Guard at a joint state and federal COVID-19 vaccination site on the campus of California State University of Los Angeles in Los Angeles on Wednesday

Motorists and passengers wait in line for their Covid-19 vaccinations administered by members of the National Guard at a joint state and federal COVID-19 vaccination site on the campus of California State University of Los Angeles in Los Angeles on Wednesday 

RN Robert Villa (right) gives a Moderna Covid-19 vaccine to Armando Montes at the newly opened City of Los Angeles vaccination site at Pierce College

RN Robert Villa (right) gives a Moderna Covid-19 vaccine to Armando Montes at the newly opened City of Los Angeles vaccination site at Pierce College


Biden will use 'his own voice and platform to take a moment to remember the people whose lives have been lost, the families who are still suffering ... at what is still a very difficult moment in this country,' White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters on Friday.

Last week, Biden said the COVID vaccine will be available to every American 'by the end of July' will millions of additional doses on the way and predicted herd immunity may be achieved as early as Christmas. 

Biden made the promise during a CNN town hall on the pandemic as his administration faces questions about its target numbers to get the vaccine into the arms of every American. 

The first question from moderator Anderson Cooper was 'when is every American who wants it going to be able to get a vaccine'.

'By the end of July of this year,' Biden responded. 'By the end of July, we'll have over 600 million doses - enough to vaccinate every single American.' 

He claimed not enough vaccines were available when he took office on January 20th.

'We came into office there was only 50 million doses that are available,' he said. His administration has repeatedly criticized the Trump administration for not having enough doses of the vaccine or a plan in place to distribute it. 

'I mean there was nothing in the refrigerator figuratively or literally speaking,' Biden said of vaccine availability when he took office. 

He also spoke of Trump derisively during the 75 minute event, calling him 'the former guy'.

Biden on Thursday singled out Trump, although he has previously praised Trump's Operation Warp Speed for its efforts on vaccine development. 

'My predecessor, to be very blunt about it, did not do his job,' Biden said. 'We won't have everything fixed for a while. But we're going to fix it.'  

3 comments:

  1. we have been conned ,cheated and looted,there needs to be a resistance movement and consequences for the perps.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, we could be thankful for what the plandemic has revealed...

      Science is fiction, vaccines are bioweapons and our government
      wants us all dead----and we will be happy.

      Delete
  2. We don't have "vaccine complacency", we have "corruption ambivalence".

    ReplyDelete