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Anna Wintour tried to save teen Vogue editor, 27, forced to resign over anti-Asian tweets she wrote as a teenager after magazine lost seven figure advertising deal - before she’d even started

 Anna Wintour tried to save the incoming editor of Teen Vogue, Alexi McCammond, it has been revealed - but could not stop her from being forced out less than two weeks after taking the job.

McCammond, 27, was fired over anti-Asian tweets she wrote as a teenager, in 2011, which surfaced online and cost Conde Nast a seven-figure ad campaign. 

McCammond's resurfaced tweets include one in which she wrote: 'Googling how to not wake up with swollen Asian eyes'.


Another now-deleted tweet read: 'Give me a 2/10 on my chem problem, cross out all of my work and don't explain what I did wrong… thanks a lot stupid Asian T.A. you're great.'

Wintour, the chief content officer and the global editorial director of Vogue, was aware of the decade-old racist tweets and discussed them with leaders of color at Condé Nast before the job was offered, The New York Times reported.

Teen Vogue editor Alexi McCammond has resigned over racist, anti-Asian tweets she wrote as a teenager surfaced online
It emerged on Thursday that Conde Nast boss Anna Wintour knew about the tweets but gave McCammond the job anyway

Teen Vogue editor Alexi McCammond has resigned over racist, anti-Asian tweets she wrote as a teenager surfaced online. It emerged on Thursday that Conde Nast boss Anna Wintour knew about the tweets but gave McCammond the job anyway

They felt she had learnt from her mistakes, but they were not aware of homophobic tweets or a photo, also from 2011, that was recently published by a right-wing website showing her in Native American costume at a Halloween party. The vetting process did not turn up the additional material because it had been deleted, the executive added. 


Wintour tried to build support for the would-be Teen Vogue editor, the paper said, and included her in team meetings.

McCammond met one-on-one with staff, to try and ease their concerns, and explained her actions in a note.

'You've seen some offensive, idiotic tweets from when I was a teenager that perpetuated harmful and racist stereotypes about Asian Americans,' she wrote in a note to her new colleagues, obtained by The Daily Beast

'I apologized for them years ago, but I want to be clear today: I apologize deeply to all of you for the pain this has caused.' 

Condé Nast's human resources department also met with the Teen Vogue staff, and the staff were reminded of a company policy requiring them to check with the communications team before making public statements. 

The staff members were also told they should keep their criticisms 'in the family' - further adding to their anger.

On Monday a meeting, scheduled for Wednesday with Wintour and top Vogue executives, was abruptly canceled and not rescheduled, indicating to McCammond that her position was no longer tenable. 

Teen Vogue Editor in Chief issues apology for racist tweets
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The Daily Beast reported that Condé Nast management called a meeting with staffers for Thursday afternoon to discuss the new editor's exit. 

The offensive tweets were deleted in 2019, when McCammond was working as a political reporter for Axios.

They resurfaced after she was named as the new editor on March 5. 

It's unclear if she ever started the job. 

On March 9, the tweets had gone viral and she was apologizing for them. 

Conde Nast initially stood by her and allowed her to keep the position. 

Staffers were irate that she was allowed to keep her job and said it sent the wrong message during a time of increased attacks on Asian Americans, but she stayed on. 

They also complained that she was inexperienced, having never worked as an editor or manager before, and that there were other black women within Conde Nast who would have been better suited to the job. 

They wrote an open letter demanding that she be replaced and also complained directly to CEO Robert Lynch.

Beauty store chain Ulta then pulled a seven-figure ad campaign with Teen Vogue over the scandal. There were also talks among sales teams that it could cost the company even more in advertising revenues. 

It has also emerged that in an email to staff around the same time Conde Nast HR boss Stan Duncan revealed that Anna Wintour and CEO Roger Lynch knew about the decade-old racist tweets but hired her anyway. 

On Thursday, McCammond tweeted that she and the company were 'parting ways'. 

It sparked a mixed reaction - some said it was appropriate given what she'd done but others called it cancel culture gone too far. They criticized Conde Nast for seemingly hanging her out to dry. 

'I want to be fully transparent with you about our decision-making process regarding her appointment. 

'When Alexi was was a teenager she made racially charged statements on social media about Asian people.

'Alexi was straight forward and transparent about these posts during our interview process and through public apologies,' HR boss Stan Duncan said in an internal memo. 

'Given her previous acknowledgement of these posts and her sincere apologies, in addition to her remarkable work in journalism elevating the voices of marginalized communities, we were looking forward to welcoming her into our community.

'In addition, we were hopeful that Alexi would become part of our team to provide perspective and insight that is underrepresented throughout the media.

'We were dedicated to making her successful in this role and spent time working with her, our company leadership and the Teen Vogue team to find the best path forward. 

'To that end, after speaking with Alexi this morning, we agreed that it was best to part ways, so as to not overshadow the important work happening at Teen Vogue,' he went on. 

In a Twitter statement on Thursday, McCammond said she and the company had decided to 'part ways'. 

McCammond's resignation also comes after her boyfriend was fired from his role as  Deputy White House Secretary for threatening to 'destroy' a female reporter if they exposed their relationship.

Before working at Vogue, McCammond was working as a political reporter at Axios. 

McCammond is dating disgraced former Deputy White House Secretary TJ Ducklo who was fired after threatening to destroy a reporter if she exposed their relationship. Before working at Vogue, McCammond worked at Axios

McCammond is dating disgraced former Deputy White House Secretary TJ Ducklo who was fired after threatening to destroy a reporter if she exposed their relationship. Before working at Vogue, McCammond worked at Axios

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