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Dr Fauci predicts high school students will be able to get a COVID vaccine before school starts in fall - and says elementary-age kids could be inoculated early next year

 High school students in the United States should be able to receive COVID-19 vaccinations by the autumn, with younger students likely to be cleared for vaccinations in early 2022, top U.S. infectious disease official Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Sunday.

'We project that high school students will very likely be able to be vaccinated by the fall term, maybe not the very first day, but certainly in the early part of the fall,' Fauci told CBS. 

He said elementary school children would likely be ready to receive vaccinations by the first quarter of next year, after studies on safety are finished. 

Currently, the vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are only approved for those 18 and older, while the Pfizer shot is cleared for those as young as 16.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said high school students could be eligible for shots before the fall term, with younger students likely to be cleared for vaccinations in early 2022

Dr. Anthony Fauci said high school students could be eligible for shots before the fall term, with younger students likely to be cleared for vaccinations in early 2022

A student in Alexandria, Virginia looks at a tablet device beside classmates at a desk surrounded by plastic shielding during an in-person hybrid learning day

A student in Alexandria, Virginia looks at a tablet device beside classmates at a desk surrounded by plastic shielding during an in-person hybrid learning day

As further studies are conducted, it is expected that the vaccines could be cleared for younger children, if they are shown to be safe and effective for kids. 

In most states, decisions on whether schools should be open are being made at the local level. Iowa, Arkansas, Texas and Florida have ordered all their schools to remain open, and West Virginia requires elementary schools to hold classes. 

Fauci also said he expected the CDC to issue relaxed guidelines for people who have already been vaccinated within 'the next couple of days,' but urged continued vigilance on mitigation measures for the over 80 percent of Americans still awaiting shots.

'We're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer,' Fauci said. 

'We want to get those death levels of the virus very, very low, and then we'll have a much, much easier time to safely pull back' on mitigation measures.


The United States is now vaccinating on average 2.1 million people a day -- but gains made against the virus over the past month were showing signs of waning.

Nationwide, the U.S. reported a 3 percent decline in new cases of COVID-19 last week, a much smaller drop than in the previous six weeks.

New cases fell as much as 25 percent in the week ended February 7 and 23 percent in the week ended February 21, before plateauing last week, according to a Reuters analysis.

The decline in cases had begun to plateau at 60,000 to 70,000 new infections per day, which Fauci said was not acceptable. 

He pointed to the need to continue mask mandates and other mitigation measures to avoid a resurgence as new variants emerge.

A new variant was spreading in the New York City area and was proving 'rather vigorous' in its ability to spread and eluded somewhat the protection offered by monoclonal antibodies and the vaccines, he said. 

Signs calling for Los Angeles schools to reopen are displayed by people in passing vehicles during an "Open Schools Now" rally via car caravan last month

Signs calling for Los Angeles schools to reopen are displayed by people in passing vehicles during an "Open Schools Now" rally via car caravan last month

A student raises his hand to ask a question in Alexandria, Virginia on March 2

A student raises his hand to ask a question in Alexandria, Virginia on March 2

'One of the things that I think we should point out, every day that goes by that we keep the lid on things will get better and better because we're putting now at least two million vaccinations into the arms of individuals each day,' he said. 

'And as the days and weeks go by, you have more and more protection, not only of individuals, but of the community. So we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer.'

Fauci said that the vaccine supply would be 'dramatically increased' in the coming weeks as production ramps up. 

The United States has administered 90,351,750 doses of COVID-19 vaccines as of Sunday morning and distributed 116,363,405 doses, the CDC said. 

The agency said 58,873,710 people had received one or more doses while 30,686,881 people have received the second dose as of Sunday.

A total of 7,389,102 vaccine doses have been administered in long-term care facilities, the agency said. 


2 comments:

  1. Why a vaccine for a virus with a 99.9% survival rate?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FEAR being used to CULL the non thinking sheep

      Delete