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Lori Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli 'aggressively' confronted daughter Olivia Jade's high school counselor and called him a 'nosy f**k' after he told USC that she didn't row crew amid college admissions scandal, new Netflix doc reveals

 Lori Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli berated his daughter Olivia Jade's high school counselor for telling USC that she didn't row crew, as she'd claimed in her application.  

The dramatic scene is featured in a Netflix's new Operation Varsity Blues documentary about Rick Singer, the mastermind behind the 2019 college admissions scandal that sent Loughlin, Giannulli and several other prominent parents to prison. 

Loughlin and Giannulli were sentenced to two and five months in prison, respectively, for paying Singer $500,000 to get their daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella into USC as crew recruits. Neither teen participated in the sport but their applications featured photos of them posing on rowing machines. 

The Netflix film released Wednesday splices together real-life interviews with re-enactments of events described in court records - including the moment Giannulli confronted the high school counselor about his conversations with the USC admissions office.

The counselor, who was not named, told authorities that he contacted the university after noticing that Olivia Jade had been flagged as a crew recruit and said he had no knowledge of her being involved in the sport. 

News of what the counselor said was a 'routine meeting' made its way back to Giannulli, who went to the high school and 'aggressively' asked why he was meddling in Olivia Jade's future. In a recording the father was heard calling the counselor a 'nosey f**k'. 

Lori Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli berated his daughter Olivia Jade's high school counselor after he told USC that he didn't believe she rowed crew, as she'd claimed in her application. Loughlin and Giannulli are pictured leaving court in August 2019 after a hearing in the college admissions scandal that landed them both prison

Lori Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli berated his daughter Olivia Jade's high school counselor after he told USC that he didn't believe she rowed crew, as she'd claimed in her application. Loughlin and Giannulli are pictured leaving court in August 2019 after a hearing in the college admissions scandal that landed them both prison

Olivia Jade's high school counselor, who was not named, told authorities that he contacted USC after noticing that the teen (pictured) had been flagged as a crew recruit and said he had no knowledge of her being involved in the sport

Olivia Jade's high school counselor, who was not named, told authorities that he contacted USC after noticing that the teen (pictured) had been flagged as a crew recruit and said he had no knowledge of her being involved in the sport

Loughlin and Giannulli included photos of their daughters Olivia Jade (pictured) and Isabella posing on rowing machines in their bid to have the girls admitted to USC as crew recruits
Isabella is depicted in another bogus photo submitted to USC

Loughlin and Giannulli included photos of their daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella (left to right) posing on rowing machines in their bid to have the girls admitted to USC as crew recruits

Prosecutors described Giannulli and Loughlin's animosity toward the counselor in court documents ahead of their sentencing last fall.  

In January 2018, the prosecutors claimed, the couple and Olivia Jade were discussing the risk of the counselor 'disrupting their scheme'.

'When their daughter asked whether she should list USC as her top choice school, Loughlin replied: “Yes . . . . But it might be a flag for the weasel to meddle,"' prosecutors wrote.  

'Giannulli added: "F[***] him," and remarked that the counselor was a "nosey b****d." Loughlin thereafter instructed her daughter: "Don't say too much to that man."'

Three months later, after she had been 'flagged' as a recruit for the school's crew team, the counselor intervened, telling USC officials that he had no knowledge of her ever being involved in the sport. 

'Based on what I knew of her video blogging schedule highly doubted she was involved in crew,' he said, in reference to her lucrative YouTube account where she made money through make-up tutorial videos.  

Loughlin and Giannulli (pictured in April 2019) were sentenced to two and five months in prison, respectively, for paying Singer $500,000 to get their daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella into USC as crew recruits

Loughlin and Giannulli (pictured in April 2019) were sentenced to two and five months in prison, respectively, for paying Singer $500,000 to get their daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella into USC as crew recruits

The counselor's intervention also caused concern for Donna Heinel, the USC administrator who had allegedly been facilitating Singer's scam. 

When she learned that Giannulli had confronted the counselor she left a panicked voicemail for Singer, saying: 'I don't want anybody walking into the school and yelling at the counselors.' 

It wasn't until a few months later that investigators caught wind of the scheme in an investigation dubbed Operation Varsity Blues. 

Netflix's documentary Operation Varsity Blues tells the story Rick Singer (pictured), the mastermind behind the 2019 college admissions scandal

Netflix's documentary Operation Varsity Blues tells the story Rick Singer (pictured), the mastermind behind the 2019 college admissions scandal

Singer began cooperating with investigators in September 2018 and secretly recorded his phone calls with parents to build the case against them. 

He ultimately pleaded guilty in 2019 to racketeering, money laundering and fraud. He faces up to 65 years in prison but will not be officially sentenced until everyone else indicted in the scheme is.  

Prosecutors said parents paid Singer more than $25million to cheat their children into the country's most esteemed colleges between 2011 and 2018.  

The film features a glimpse of some the real interactions between Singer and the parents - recordings of which would later go on to indict more than 50 people on federal charges.

'We help the wealthiest families in the US get their kids into school,' actor Matthew Modine, who plays Singer, is heard bragging in the film. 

'So I’ve done 761 of what I would call side-doors. The front door means getting in on your own. So I’ve created this sort of side door in, because my families want a guarantee.'

The fictional Singer later adds: 'I'm gonna' do 730 of these side doors this year.'

Operation Varsity Blue: The College Admissions Scandal trailer
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'We help the wealthiest families in the US get their kids into school,' actor Matthew Modine who plays Singer, is heard bragging in the film

'We help the wealthiest families in the US get their kids into school,' actor Matthew Modine who plays Singer, is heard bragging in the film

In another scene from the film, a parent is heard asking Singer: 'Is there any risk that this thing blows up in my face?' if it's discovered the 'polo team is selling seats into the school for $250,000'.

'Well no, because she's a water polo player.' Singer responds, before his client, sounding more skeptical, replies: 'But she's not.' 

Interviews with real investigators and prosecutors also recount the blatancy of the scheme, which typically saw students pretending to be athletes in sports they had never played.

'There aren’t many federal cases where you’d have 50 people indicted for a crime. It truly is amazing what people will say on the phone when they don’t know the feds are listening,' one featuree, who wasn't identified, says in the trailer.

Another adds: 'It seem like [the scandal] would be hard to miss. There was a five-foot-five basketball player, [and] a cheerleader who was made to look like a lacrosse player.'

The film also reveals how the scheme unraveled after Los Angeles businessman Morrie Tobin was arrested on unrelated charges for securities fraud in the spring of 2018 and ended up trading information about how Singer helped get his kids into college.  

The documentary is from Chris Smith and Jon Karmen, the filmmakers behind Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened. 

Smith also executive produced Netflix's wildly popular docu-series Tiger King, which was released at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic last spring.

More than 50 people were charged in the scandal that saw parents pay bribes to have someone cheat on their children’s entrance exams or pretend their kids were star athletes for sports they didn’t play

More than 50 people were charged in the scandal that saw parents pay bribes to have someone cheat on their children’s entrance exams or pretend their kids were star athletes for sports they didn’t play

Singer, who has also pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy, began cooperating with investigators in September 2018

Singer, who has also pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy, began cooperating with investigators in September 2018

More than 50 people were charged in the scandal that saw parents pay bribes of up to $6million to get their children into top universities like Yale, Stanford, Georgetown and USC in what authorities described as the 'largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice.'  

Actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman were among the most high-profile defendants in the case.  

Huffman and her spouse — 'Shameless' star William H. Macy, who was not charged — made a charitable donation of $15,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme, on behalf of their eldest daughter. 

Huffman had initially planned to do the same thing for her youngest daughter, before later backing out, investigators said. 

Loughlin and Giannulli initially pleaded not guilty, claiming they believed they were making a legitimate contribution to USC with their $500,000 payment to Singer.

Facing up to 40 years behind bars each, they later reversed course and struck a plea deal with prosecutors.

Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence, as stated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

The Full House star reportedly had a 'tearful' reunion with her daughters Olivia Jade, 21, and Bella Rose, 22, when she finally returned to their Malibu mansion. 

Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence. Giannulli is still behind bars and is due to be release in April

Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence. Giannulli is still behind bars and is due to be release in April

The couple initially professed their innocence when they were charged, claiming they believed they were making a legitimate contribution to USC with their $500,000 payment to Singer (Loughlin is above with daughters Olivia Jade, left, and Isabella Rose, right)

The couple initially professed their innocence when they were charged, claiming they believed they were making a legitimate contribution to USC with their $500,000 payment to Singer (Loughlin is above with daughters Olivia Jade, left, and Isabella Rose, right)

Giannulli, however, is still serving his five-month sentence at a prison in Lompoc near Santa Barbara, California for his role in the college admissions bribery scheme.

He is scheduled to be released on April 17. Prosecutors said Giannulli deserved a tougher sentence because he was 'the more active participant in the scheme'.

Huffman, who admitted her guilt from the start, served nearly two weeks in prison last year.

Of the nearly 60 parents, coaches and others charged in the case, about a dozen are still fighting the allegations. The sentences for the parents who have pleaded so far in the case range from a couple weeks to nine months.

Singer is expected to testify at the remaining defendants’ trials. He has not been sentenced.

1 comment:

  1. The Real Crime here is those hard working students who's honest work/devotion to achieving the best schools were knocked out of slots taken by these cheaters. They should be first in line for any reparations paid out in these cases. Not in that league however my deepest respect for those passing up the parties and teen life to chase the Ivy School Golden Ring. When within grasp have it pulled away then returned for the rider behind them....

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