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Dozens of churches are vandalized and torched in Canada after hundreds of unmarked graves were discovered at sites of former residential schools for Indigenous children run by the Catholic church

 Dozens of Christian churches on indigenous lands in Canada have been torched and vandalized since unmarked graves of indigenous children near First Nation boarding schools were first discovered at the end of May. 

Since then, more than 1,000 graves have been found near Native American boarding schools - many of which were run by the Catholic Church and were part of an abusive system that the country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission called 'cultural genocide' in 2015.

After the graves were found, about 12 churches were burned throughout the country between June 21 and July 9. 


Most of the fires were set near the town of Penticton, British Columbia - about 40 miles north of Washington state - the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said in multiple statements.

It is estimated that there have been about 45 acts of arson or vandalism to Canadian Christian churches or places of worship since June. 


Flames engulf a Catholic church as firefighters work to extinguish the fire at St. Jean Baptiste Parish in Morinville, Alberta, Canada June 30

Flames engulf a Catholic church as firefighters work to extinguish the fire at St. Jean Baptiste Parish in Morinville, Alberta, Canada June 30

The St. Jean Baptiste Parish fire in Alberta on June 30 was the second major fire in less than a week

The St. Jean Baptiste Parish fire in Alberta on June 30 was the second major fire in less than a week 

About a dozen Christian Churches on Indigenous lands in Canada have been torched in the last month

About a dozen Christian Churches on Indigenous lands in Canada have been torched in the last month

 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said they're investigating all of the blazes at Catholic churches in Canada as 'suspicious' and looking to see if they're connected.  

The fires started after the remains of 215 indigenous children were found in late May on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia. 

On June 24, the Cowessess First Nation said it had discovered the unmarked graves of an estimated 751 people near the site of the former Catholic-run Marieval Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan.  

Less than a week later - on June 30 - the Lower Kootenay Band said the aq'am First Nation discovered the remains of about 182 people near the site of the former Catholic-run St. Eugene's Mission School near Cranbrook, British Columbia. 

The discoveries coincided with the rash of church burnings, although police haven't definitively connected the two.  

Maryanne Klaassen looks inside the church doors covered in red paint at Grace Presbyterian Church on July 3. It's among dozens of Canadian churches that have been vandalized

Maryanne Klaassen looks inside the church doors covered in red paint at Grace Presbyterian Church on July 3. It's among dozens of Canadian churches that have been vandalized 

The fires and vandalism, like what's shown here  onwalls at Saint Bonaventure Catholic Church on July 3, began have the discovery of unmarked graves in schools that were run mostly by the Catholic church

The fires and vandalism, like what's shown here  onwalls at Saint Bonaventure Catholic Church on July 3, began have the discovery of unmarked graves in schools that were run mostly by the Catholic church

Firefighters inspect the damage at the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church destroyed by fire in Morinville, Alberta on  July 1

Firefighters inspect the damage at the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church destroyed by fire in Morinville, Alberta on  July 1


On June 21, the Sacred Heart Church on Penticton Indian Band land and St. Gregory's Catholic Church on the Osoyoos Indian Band land, which are 25 miles apart, burned down within two hours of each, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 

Five days later - June 26 - St. Ann's Catholic Church on Upper Similkameen Indian Band land and the Chopaka Catholic Church on Lower Similkameen Indian Band land were torched within two hours of each other. 

The same night, the century-old abandoned St. Paul's Anglican Church on Gitwangak First Nations land was set on fire, but the damage was minimal, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.  

On June 28 and June 30, a Catholic church on Siksika First Nation land near Calgary was set ablaze and the Catholic St. Jean Baptiste Church in Morinville, Alberta, burned to the ground, Royal Canadian Mounted Police said.

During the first week of July, there were Catholic church fires, including two on July 1, one on July 2 and one on July 4. 

The July 2 blaze brought down the St. Columba Anglican in Tofino, British Columbia, which the Royal Canadian Mounted Police spokesperson Sgt. Chris Manseau said in a statement is a church that's been in the community for over 100 years and 'is of significant historical importance.

Father Fenando Genogaling stands in front of Red and Orange paint on the walls at St. Luke's Catholic Church is seen on July 3 in Calgary

Father Fenando Genogaling stands in front of Red and Orange paint on the walls at St. Luke's Catholic Church is seen on July 3 in Calgary 

The community church is seen five years before the establishment of the Kuper Island Indian Residential School, which according to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation operated from 1890-1975, on Penelakut Island, formerly known as Kuper Island, near Chemainus, British Columbia

The community church is seen five years before the establishment of the Kuper Island Indian Residential School, which according to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation operated from 1890-1975, on Penelakut Island, formerly known as Kuper Island, near Chemainus, British Columbia

Shoes placed on the steps of the Manitoba Legislature to honour hundreds of children recently discovered in unmarked graves on the sites of several former residential schools across Canada on July 2. The discovery of unmarked graves coincided with the fires in Christian churches

Shoes placed on the steps of the Manitoba Legislature to honour hundreds of children recently discovered in unmarked graves on the sites of several former residential schools across Canada on July 2. The discovery of unmarked graves coincided with the fires in Christian churches 

In addition to the dozen or so churches set on fire, many have been desecrated or vandalized

This is the aftermath of the fire of  the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church destroyed by fire in Morinville, Alberta on July 1

This is the aftermath of the fire of  the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church destroyed by fire in Morinville, Alberta on July 1

'Investigators are aware of the recent church fires occurring around the province, and will share information with them to determine if there is a link, however at this time there is nothing indicating so,' he said. 

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are investigating two more fires at Catholic churches in Canada as 'suspicious,' after four churches on tribal lands burned down within one week. 

There were multiple acts of vandalism and a small fire to a church in Alberta on July 9. A youth, whose age and name weren't released, was arrested, police said. 

That's been the only arrest made in connection with any of the fires or vandalism that's plagued Canadian churches over the last month. 

Countersignal.com estimates there have been about 45 acts of arson or vandalism to Canadian Christian churches or places of worship since June. 

Following the the discoveries of the graves, Preston McBride, a Dartmouth College scholar, predicts as 40,000 native children may have died from poor care at government-run boarding schools. 

Siding is stripped off an exterior wall after a fire at St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church in Indian Brook June 30

Siding is stripped off an exterior wall after a fire at St. Kateri Tekakwitha Church in Indian Brook June 30

Firefighters extinguish fire at the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church in Morinville, Alberta on July 1 but weren't able to save it

Firefighters extinguish fire at the Roman Catholic St. Jean Baptiste church in Morinville, Alberta on July 1 but weren't able to save it

Countersignal.com estimates there have been about 45 acts of arson or vandalism to Canadian Christian churches or places of worship since June, including what's seen here on Saint Mary's Catholic Cathedral in Calgary

Countersignal.com estimates there have been about 45 acts of arson or vandalism to Canadian Christian churches or places of worship since June, including what's seen here on Saint Mary's Catholic Cathedral in Calgary

Earlier this month, a violent mob celebrated 'tearing this b**ch down' as they toppled and desecrated statues of Britain's Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II during Canada protests sparked by the discovery of mass graves of indigenous school children.   

The bronze sculptures of Britain's current monarch and her great-great grandmother in Winnipeg were hauled down, daubed with red paint and even appeared to have been strangled with Mohawk flags on July 1. 

With no police to be seen anywhere, protesters in orange led by members of the left-wing anti-colonial 'Idle No More' group campaigning for Canada Day to be cancelled, tied ropes to the necks of the statues and ripped them to the ground to chants of 'no to genocide' and 'bring her down' amid fury over the deaths of 1,000 indigenous children found buried in mass graves this month. 

A gigantic statue of Queen Victoria has been torn down and daubed in red paint in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on Canada Day as a backlash over the country's colonial history ramps up

A gigantic statue of Queen Victoria has been torn down and daubed in red paint in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on Canada Day as a backlash over the country's colonial history ramps up


Queen Elizabeth's  statue was also torn down amid growing anger in Canada over the treatment of its indigenous communities over hundreds of years

Queen Elizabeth's  statue was also torn down amid growing anger in Canada over the treatment of its indigenous communities over hundreds of years


Sharing footage of Victoria's statue coming down, self-styled 'Land Defender' Waabishkaa Ma'iingan Naakshig, tweeted: 'I helped tear the b**ch down'.

The statue was then covered in red paint with a message that read 'we were children once. Bring them home'. 

A smaller statue of Elizabeth was also toppled in the same area, with protesters insisting both royals are the face of Canada's colonial history.  

1,500 miles west, a statue of Captain Cook - the first Briton to land in British Columbia - was also pulled down in the city of Victoria before being hurled into the harbor in scenes reminiscent of the destruction of the Edward Colston statue in Bristol, UK, last year. Cook's statue was replaced by a red wooden dress - a colour and symbol for indigenous people in Canada with the plinth vandalised with 'colonizer'. 

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson condemned the toppling of statues of the Queen and Queen Elizabeth in Canada.

Mr Johnson's spokesman said: 'We obviously condemn any defacing of statues of the Queen', adding: Our thoughts are with Canada's indigenous community following these tragic discoveries and we follow these issues closely and continue to engage with the government of Canada with indigenous matters.'  

The attacks have been spearheaded by Idle No More, a left-wing organisation that describes itself as 'a grassroots advocacy group, opposing unilateral & colonial legislation' in Canada, but also campaigns on global issues including for Justin Trudeau to sanction Israel over its treatment of Palestinians.     

Prime Minister Trudeau said recently he was 'terribly saddened' by the discovery at Marieval Indian Residential School, and told indigenous people that 'the hurt and the trauma that you feel is Canada's responsibility to bear'.

But it appears protesters are also focussed on damaging monuments of British queens, even though the country became an independent state in 1867 while retaining its link to the Royal Family.     

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops said in a June 29 statement that the pope will meet separately at the Vatican with the representatives of Canada’s three biggest Indigenous groups — the First Nations, the Métis and the Inuit - in December. 

'Pope Francis is deeply committed to hearing directly from Indigenous Peoples, expressing his heartfelt closeness, addressing the impact of colonization and the role of the Church in the residential school system,' bishops said in their statement. 

 The US has already launched a federal investigation. 

US Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said in a June 22 memo that her department will prepare a report that identifies federal boarding school facilities, map out the locations of known and possible student burial sites, and learn the identities and tribal affiliations of the children.

In her memo, Haaland - a member of the Laguna Pueblo tribe and first Native American Cabinet Secretary - said most indigenous parents could not visit their children at these schools, where some were abused, killed and buried in unmarked graves. 

1 comment:

  1. Gee looks exactly like what the Jews did to Russia after their Bolshevik communist take over in 1917

    ReplyDelete