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Moderna won't hit the September 20 goal for booster shots Dr. Fauci says but claims Pfizer boosters will be ready for administration that day

 Anthony Fauci said Sunday that the Moderna booster shot may not be ready by September 20 as previously thought – but said the booster for the Pfizer vaccine is on track to get the go-ahead later this month.

He said the plan to begging administering booster shots for coronavirus vaccines on September 20 is still the plan 'in some respects,' but noted the Monderna booster will take longer to be ready than previously expected.

'We were hoping that we would get the, both the candidates, both products, Moderna and Pfizer, rolled out by the week of the 20th,' the nation's top immunologist told CBS Face the Nation guest host Weijia Jiang.

'It is conceivable that we will only have one of them out, but the other would likely follow soon thereafter,' Fauci added. 'And the reason for that is that we, as we've said right from the very beginning, we're not going to do anything unless it gets the appropriate FDA [Food and Drug Administration] regulatory approval and then the recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.'

'Looks like Pfizer has their data in and likely would meet the deadline,' he said.

'So the bottom line is very likely at least part of the plan will be implemented but ultimately the entire plan will be.'

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the Monderna booster shot won't be ready by the goal date of September 20 – but Pfizer should be ready for administration by then

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the Monderna booster shot won't be ready by the goal date of September 20 – but Pfizer should be ready for administration by then

Goal was that both boosters would be ready for administration by September 20 as the Delta variant surges and more breakthrough cases of COVID pop up

Goal was that both boosters would be ready for administration by September 20 as the Delta variant surges and more breakthrough cases of COVID pop up

Fauci also recommended that people try to get the same booster shot associated with the original vaccine they received as studies are ongoing to determine if mixing vaccines provides an effective booster.

Health officials originally planned to roll out both boosters for Pfizer and Moderna at the same time.

Fauci said that Pfizer-BioNTech already submitted the necessary data on booster shots to the FDA, but Moderna has yet to complete the process.

In a statement released Wednesday, Moderna said it had 'initiated its submission' of booster data to the FDA.

Last month the Biden administration announced it would start offering boosters to Americans by Sept. 20, usurping the process by which the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention usually decide on such issues, current and former FDA scientists and CDC advisory panel members told Reuters.

Scientists are still debating how much additional immunity boosters provide and whether all Americans should get another shot, rather than just those at high risk of severe illness.


Speaking Sunday, Fauci emphasized that both boosters were assumed to be safe, but that the FDA and other officials would study the data to make sure.

'When you're dealing with allowing the American public to receive an intervention, you want to make sure you're absolutely certain,' he said.

Israel already started administering the first round of boosters and is set to begin preparations to administer fourth doses of the coronavirus vaccines as the country deals with soaring cases despite its trail-blazing roll-out of jabs.

The country's national coronavirus czar Salman Zarka said the country needs to prepare for a fourth injection, which could be modified to better protect against new variants of the virus.

'Given that that the virus is here and will continue to be here, we also need to prepare for a fourth injection,' he told Kan public radio.

'This is our life from now on, in waves.'

After first being detected in India earlier this summer, the Delta variant spread quickly. That fact, coupled with increases in breakthrough cases in vaccinated people, led to more research on the need for booster shots.

The Delta variant is driving a surge in the U.S. with new daily cases four times higher than they were a year ago despite rising vaccination rates.


On Friday, the national seven-day rolling average of daily new cases was nearly 163,000, an increase of more than 300 percent from Labor Day weekend 2020, according to a DailyMail.com analysis of Johns Hopkins data.

Hospitalizations also doubled, and deaths were up 80 percent from last Labor Day. The figures came despite 62 percent of the total US population now having received at least one shot of COVID-19 vaccine. Fifty-three percent of the population is fully vaccinated, the CDC says.

Vaccination does appear to be reducing deaths among the most vulnerable, however, with deaths and hospitalizations rising at a slower rate than overall cases.


All three measures remain well below their US peak in early January, and there are signs that the latest wave might be cresting, with the CDC estimating that more than 80 percent of the population now has immunity either through recovering from infection or getting vaccinated.

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