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REVEALED: How Iran's top nuclear scientist was assassinated by a killer AI machine gun that allowed sniper based 1,000 miles away to fire 15 bullets after disguised spy car had pinpointed his location

 Iran's top nuclear scientist was assassinated by a killer robot machine gun kitted out with artificial intelligence and multiple cameras and capable of firing 600 bullets a minute, according to a new report.

Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, 62, dubbed the 'father' of Iran's illegal atomic program, is said to have been killed in the November 27 ambush by a Mossad sniper who pulled the trigger from an undisclosed location more than 1,000 miles away thanks to the use of satellite.

The gun which fired the fatal shots was positioned in a camera-laden pickup truck lying in wait for his vehicle to come past the ambush point. 

It was programmed with AI technology to compensate for a 1.6 second lapse between the intel from the kill site and the sniper's actions, as well as movements caused by the shots being fired and Fakhrizadeh's car driving. 

This precision enabled the sniper to hit the desired target and leave Fakhrizadeh's wife, who was in the passenger seat next to him, unscathed. 

There was also a second disguised spy car positioned three-quarters of a mile earlier along the route in a spot where Fakhrizadeh's car would make a U-turn to turn down the road toward his country home in Absard, a town east of Tehran.

Cameras fitted in this decoy vehicle positively identified Fakhrizadeh and pinpointed the scientist's location in the car - in the driver's seat with his wife in the passenger seat - sending this information back to the remote sniper. 

The entire ambush was over within one minute of the first round being fired.  

This map shows where Mohsen Fakhrizadeh's car was first picked up at the U-turn by the decoy car before it was ambushed by the robot machine gun hidden in a pickup truck

This map shows where Mohsen Fakhrizadeh's car was first picked up at the U-turn by the decoy car before it was ambushed by the robot machine gun hidden in a pickup truck

Iran's top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh (above) was assassinated November 27

Iran's top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh (above) was assassinated November 27

The new details emerged in a New York Times report, based on interviews with American, Israeli and Iranian officials, including two intelligence officials familiar with the operation, as well as comments made by Fakhrizadeh's family to the Iranian news media. 

Israel's plan to take out Fakhrizadeh was said to have been many years in the making, with several previous plots mulled on the belief that he was spearheading Iran's nuclear weapon's race.

The plan then ramped up as it grew more likely that Donald Trump would not be reelected.

Trump had reversed the US's nuclear deal with Iran agreed on by his predecessor Barack Obama - and Israeli officials believed Joe Biden would reenter into the agreement. 

Officials decided to carry out the attack remotely without any agents in the field at the time of the attack.

A remote-controlled machine gun was decided upon as drones would have been easy to detect in the remote countryside location. 

One intelligence official told the New York Times the gun selected was a special model of a Belgian-made FN MAG machine gun which was then attached to an advanced robotic apparatus.

They said it was similar to Escribano's Sentinel 20 model. 

Long before November 27, Israel began smuggling the gun into Iran.

It had to be disassembled and transported in parts because altogether it weighed around a ton before being reassembled closer to the kill site. 

The machine gun was then fitted into the back of a blue Nissan Zamyad pickup truck, which was stationed by the side of the road, with tarpaulin used to disguise the machinery inside.  


The aftermath of the attack that killed Fakhrizadeh, 62, who was dubbed the ‘father’ of Iran’s illegal atomic program

The aftermath of the attack that killed Fakhrizadeh, 62, who was dubbed the 'father' of Iran's illegal atomic program

Fakhrizadeh was killed by a killer robot machine gun kitted out with artificial intelligence and multiple cameras and capable of firing 600 bullets a minute, according to a new report

Fakhrizadeh was killed by a killer robot machine gun kitted out with artificial intelligence and multiple cameras and capable of firing 600 bullets a minute, according to a new report

The pickup was also fitted with cameras to give a full picture of the surrounding area and the target.

However, officials learned there would be a 1.6 second delay between the camera capturing the images, sending them back to the sniper via satellite and for the sniper's response to reach the machine gun, reported the Times. 

Such a delay would mean the target's vehicle would have moved. 

There was also the issue that each round fired would create movement in the pickup truck.   


To tackle these concerns around accuracy, AI technology was programmed to compensate for such movements and delays. 

The car was then fitted with explosives to destroy all evidence of the killer robot.  

The decoy car was then stationed at the U-turn as, with the car forced to slow down and doing a full turn, the camera would give a clearer view inside to positively ID the target and his position in the car. 

The vehicle was made to look like a broken down car with its wheel missing and resting on a jack. 

Fakhrizadeh (right pictured with President Hassan Rouhani left) is said to have been killed by a Mossad sniper who pulled the trigger from an undisclosed location more than 1,000 miles away thanks to the use of satellite

Fakhrizadeh (right pictured with President Hassan Rouhani left) is said to have been killed by a Mossad sniper who pulled the trigger from an undisclosed location more than 1,000 miles away thanks to the use of satellite

The gun which fired the fatal shots was similar to Escribano's Sentinel 20 model

The gun which fired the fatal shots was similar to Escribano's Sentinel 20 model (left)

It is not clear how far in advance all of the elements were in place before the November 27 attack but officials told the Times the operation was give the green light at dawn that day and the US was informed of the plan.

At around midday that morning, Fakhrizadeh set off in his black Nissan Teana sedan from his home in Rostamkala with his wife.

He chose not to travel in an armored car but instead drove only with a security convoy of one vehicle in front and two close behind.

At around 3:30pm, the convoy reached the point along Firuzkouh Road where the car took the U-turn, with the decoy car then capturing Fakhrizadeh on camera.   

The convoy then continued to travel down Imam Khomeini Boulevard toward his country property. 

At this point, the Times reported that the security car in front drove ahead to secure Fakhrizadeh's property. 

The sniper took the shot, firing multiple bullets which struck below the windshield and caused the car to come to a halt. 

With the help of the AI's accuracy, the shooter repositioned and fired three times more, this time hitting the target in the shoulder.

Fakhrizadeh reportedly exited the car and was shot three more times. 

The gun was positioned in a blue Nissan Zamyad pickup truck (like the above) with tarpaulin used to disguise the machinery

The gun was positioned in a blue Nissan Zamyad pickup truck (like the above) with tarpaulin used to disguise the machinery

In total, the sniper fired 15 shots at the target, who is said to have died in his wife's arms. 

The account appears to confirm the more far-fetched theory of how the assassination plot was carried out.

Iran claimed previously a killer robot killed the top nuclear scientist but the claims had been rubbished. 

However, according to the Times, the explosives inside the pickup truck did not fully destroy the evidence, giving Iranian officials clues to how the attack was carried out.  

Fakhrizadeh was long suspected by the West of masterminding a secret nuclear bomb program for Iran. 


A funeral ceremony for Fakhrizadeh. The entire ambush was over within one minute of the first round being fired

A funeral ceremony for Fakhrizadeh. The entire ambush was over within one minute of the first round being fired

11 comments:

  1. More good reasons to NUKE ISRAEL. Slimy scumbag SATANIC MURDERING RAPING EVIL ISRAEL who DID USS Liberty, ISIS, 911 and Epstein. Served by P0S Epstein GUILTY Trump who MURDERED General Soleimani who was GOOD at killing FAGGOTY Israeli ISIS. RevelationS 2 vs 9 people.

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    1. They are god's chosen people, however the god's name is Beelzebub

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  2. jew pigs are still at it ,give them hell on earth they earned it.

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  3. Well I wish Iran would would just bomb the hell out of Israel and get it over with. assassination after assassination, strike after strike, sabotage after sabotage. Who could blame Iran if they decided to finally fight back and bomb Israel back. Israel is a rogue country who disregards international law with their occupation and theft of Palestinian land and their constant bombing or sabotage of Iran and Syria. They have a genocide going against the native Palestinians. Today's Holocaust survivors are the Palestinians.

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    1. They can't bomb Israel and they know it. Israel and the US have an agreement that if Israel gets into a war (even if they start it) the US will side with Israel and protect them. Iran and Russia have a similar deal except it matters who starts it there. If Iran started a war I am not sure if Russia would get involved but these assassinations are an act of war. So technically Israel has already started a hot war with Iran but no one wants to have the US involved right now because many world leaders aren't exactly sure who is in charge over here and with all the nukes....Well I'm sure you see the point there.

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    1. Why not? With todays tech in satellites and computers it's totally possible. Hell just think about all the commands NASA gives all these space probes every day. They have a helicopter on Mars they remotely control. Now tell me why a state assassin couldn't use satellites and computers to kill someone a thousand miles away when we have military geeks sitting in computer rooms shooting people half way around the globe with remote controlled drones.

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  5. @ "Unknown" - Yes, Israel is a cancerous regime in the Middle East, practicing Apartheid. It is essentially a failed state, relying on its slave/host, the USSA. Israel uses the 'Holocaust Industry' as a major revenue source, and is good at killing and destroying (like the Pentagon). Nevertheless, please do NOT advocate using nuclear weapons on ANYone!

    Instead, the U.S. should immediately end *all* aid to rogue state Israel - and insist that all the money provided to that "nation" (with no fixed borders nor real Constitution) be repaid to us - with interest. If the Israeli's resist, then don't allow any of their nationals (remember the dancing, celebrating Israeli Mossad agents on 9/11?) to emigrate to the United States. They should be allowed to visit, but not stay here. (Also, we should rebuild political relations with Iran, Syria & Libya - and let Israel fend for itself. Something tells me within one year, the Israeli’s would be begging us to reconsider. ;-) )

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  6. @ Madness Hub & its anonymous author:

    1) Iran is allowed to have its peaceful nuclear power program - so you lied & defamed Iran when you repeatedly claimed it was "illegal";

    2) Your writing this type of article, which seemingly condones the actually illegal murder carried out by Mossad (which allegedly helped orchestrate the 9/11 attacks against the only nation which slavishly supports & protects it), is reprehensible. How would you feel if an Iranian sniper shot one of your loved ones for your having written this propaganda piece? I'll bet your tone condoning violence would change real quick...

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  7. Iran was around long before "Israel"... and will still be here after Israel no longer exists.

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