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Woke Virginia school board votes to investigate whether to pay black residents reparations after it ignored landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling banning segregation for 14 years after it was passed

 A scandal-hit school board has now launched a study into whether it would be appropriate to give reparations to black people after it previously ignored a landmark desegregation ruling. 

Loudoun County in Virginia voted 6-3 in favor of beginning the study Tuesday after it was proposed by supervisor Juli Briskman.

Speaking to Fox5 about her proposal, Briskman said: 'The anti-CRT (critical race theory) movement is much more about 'today' and what we're teaching today. And my board member initiative is looking back at potential harm that was because we operated segregated schools illegally against the ruling of Brown vs. the Board of Education.'

Briskman was referring to Loudoun County's decision to continue segregating schools until 1968, a full 14 years after the landmark 1954 Brown V Board of Education ruling that doing so was unconstitutional.   

Loudon County Supervisor Juli Briskman called for the vote to support an investigation into the 'potential harm' the county caused its black constituents

Loudon County Supervisor Juli Briskman called for the vote to support an investigation into the 'potential harm' the county caused its black constituents  

Briskman cited that the school district continued to segregate schools for nearly 14 years after the Supreme Court ruled the process unconstitutional

Briskman cited that the school district continued to segregate schools for nearly 14 years after the Supreme Court ruled the process unconstitutional 

In 1956, Loudoun County supported a Constitutional amendment to direct funds towards paying for white children to attend private schools so they could avoid attending segregated schools.

The same month, the board passed a resolution banning funding for desegregated schools. That was rescinded in 1962, although Loudoun County schools didn't finally integrate until 1968. The board previously apologized for its past behavior in September 2020.  

The issue will now be passed to a joint committee made of members from the Board of Supervisors and School Board which will then partner with the black community to recommend solutions. 

If the board ultimately does decide to pay reparations, it remains unclear who will receive the money, and how much will be paid to recipients.  

Briskman claimed there is evidence that the Board of Supervisors and School Board prevented black students from receiving the same level of education as white students for nearly fourteen years after the US Supreme Court ruling. 

She said the evidence includes the Board of Supervisors' 1956 vote in favor of a proposed amendment to Virginia's Constitution to grant the use of public funds for private schools. Briskman said the proposal was introduced to make private education more affordable for white families who did not want their children attending integrated public school systems. 

There also seems to be evidence of action taken to block funding and prohibit improvements to black schools. 

Briskman was also asked about board meeting clashes over the teaching of critical race theory at Loudoun County, but suggested it was being used as a wedge issue to energize locals to vote in the 2022 mid-term elections.


She explained: 'I would just encourage our joint committee or whatever commission comes out of this to just ignore the outside noise because what's happening in (neighboring) Fairfax and Loudon County, in many ways has little to do with us and more to do with 'message testing' for the 2022 elections and beyond.' 

Democrats tend to support the teaching of anti-racist initiatives, while Republicans have almost uniformly come out against it.  

Last summer the Board of Supervisors and School Board issued a joint apology for their roles in 'operating segregated schools, resisting integration and the persistent educational inequities that resulted from these actions' going back to 1870. 

After the statement was released, some Loundon residents and the local NAACP chapter called for changes to be made in the legislative processes for funding, increased access to preparatory classes, and restitution. 

Loudon County has become a battle ground for the country's culture war debating hot button issues such as Critical Race Theory and transgender rights in its public schools. Parents are pictured clashing with board members at a meeting earlier this year

Loudon County has become a battle ground for the country's culture war debating hot button issues such as Critical Race Theory and transgender rights in its public schools. Parents are pictured clashing with board members at a meeting earlier this year 

In June a man was arrested when a school board meeting debating transgender rights got out of hand

In June a man was arrested when a school board meeting debating transgender rights got out of hand 

'I¿m a teacher, but I serve God first. And I will not affirm that a biological boy can be a girl and vice versa, because it is against my religion. It¿s lying to a child. It¿s abuse to a child,' PE Tanner Cross said at the school board meeting, which later resulted in his suspension

'I’m a teacher, but I serve God first. And I will not affirm that a biological boy can be a girl and vice versa, because it is against my religion. It’s lying to a child. It’s abuse to a child,' PE Tanner Cross said at the school board meeting, which later resulted in his suspension 

The vote to launch the study comes after a summer of heated debate regarding the reaching of critical race theory and debate over policies designed to help transgender students

Loudon County has become the battle ground for the country's culture war debating hot button issues such as CRT and transgender rights.  

In April, the county announced that they planned to allocate more then $6 million to 'equity training' which was met with strong opposition by some residents. 

They claimed that training was part of a pro-CRT push which would lead to students seeing themselves as victims or oppressors, depending on their race.  

This summer a rowdy school board meeting debating transgender rights ended in an arrest.

An elementary school teacher, Tanner Cross, sued the school system and was reinstated after he was suspended or refusing to use a transgender student's preferred pronouns citing that it went against his religious beliefs. 

Cross, a physical education teacher, was filmed sharing his beliefs at a meeting. He became a hero in conservative circles, and was also condemned as a bigot by online progressives.

Earlier this month an organization against critical race theory, spent half a million dollars on ads criticizing the Loudon County School Board. 

The Free to Learn Coalition launched the ads during the Washington Football Team's Sunday game. They will continue to run on local broadcast for the next two weeks. 

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