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'Evil' curriculum salesman boasts about violating Georgia's CRT ban, admits disguising teachings as DEI, Project Veritas reports

 On Tuesday, Project Veritas released a video of an education specialist referring to himself as an "evil salesman" for violating Georgia laws by selling to school districts a curriculum that contained critical race theory teachings disguised as diversity, equity, and inclusion.

A Project Veritas journalist captured undercover videos of Dr. Quintin Bostic admitting to selling a curriculum that violated Georgia's ban on critical race theory. Bostic, a former educator, had his teaching license revoked around 2017.

In one of the videos, Bostic can be heard explaining, "If you don't say the word 'critical race theory,' you can technically teach it."

At one point, the undercover journalist notes, "It's amazing how you've gotten the schools to purchase the curriculum."

Bostic quickly replies, "And they don't even know what's going on. I would say I'm a good salesman, but I'm also an evil salesman."

Bostic acknowledged that taxpayers are unaware that their funds are being used by school districts to purchase CRT curricula disguised as DEI.

He noted that marketing the teachings as DEI "is more accepted than, like, anti-racist education or critical race theory."

Two school districts currently have Bostic's curriculum, which includes teaching for kindergarteners. However, Bostic noted that neither the districts nor the state government are aware that his curriculum violates Georgia law.

"They have no clue, and I'm like, 'This is great, that's good,'" he stated.

According to Bostic, the goal is "to get the kids to influence their parents to make the [ideological] shift too."

At one point, he refers to Georgia Governor Brian Kemp (R) as "an idiot." Bostic added that if Kemp's wife, who is a former educator, found out about the illegal curriculum, he would "be nailed."

When asked if he was concerned about pushback from parents, Bostic gloated, "Who cares? I'm not part of the system. I'm not gonna lose my job over it. The worst that's gonna happen is y'all gonna be upset that I shared some knowledge. That's the worst that's gonna happen."

"If they come and take my business license … I can keep consulting," he added.

Bostic is also a content manager for Teaching Lab, a nonprofit organization "with a mission to fundamentally shift the paradigm of teacher professional learning for educational equity." Project Veritas clarified that Bostic uses his own account to sell the curriculum, not the organization's.

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